a bare face lie?

LV4-26

Senior Member
Good evening friends,

I've just been watching a video clip from East Enders (BBC1). And this is what I think I heard.
Sharon : I came to see you this morning as a friend and you told me a bare face lie.

Does such an expression as bare face (or bare-face?) lie exist? Or did I mishear? If I didn't, could you tell me what bare face means here?

In case, here it is, video clip #2 << Link no longer works. >>
So if I did mishear you can tell me what she really says.

Thks a lot
PS : Of course, there's a lot more words I can't figure out but...one thread, one question :)

Jean-Michel
 
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  • maxiogee

    Banned
    English
    It does sound like she says "a bare face lie".
    I'm more used to hearing "a bare faced lie" —> it means one that makes no attempt to disguise what it is.
     

    tonyray

    Senior Member
    English, U.S.A.
    Yes, bold faced lie is more common in the US. In any case, it means that one tells a lie to someone both of them knowing that it is a lie. It's bare-faced, straight up, and to the point... the idea is not to save face but to tell a lie and not care about whether the other person knows it's a lie or not.
     

    LV4-26

    Senior Member
    maxiogee said:
    what's the very last bit?
    marget said:
    Do you mean the last bit of the clip? "He's bad news, Sharon, and he's gonna drag you down with him".
    No, that, I've got. Strangely, I understand each and every word up to :
    "Yeah, well, you can call it what you want"
    (except maybe a couple of character names).
    After that, I get some words here and there (including Phil's very last words above), but on the whole, Sharon speaks faster and her cockney (?) accent gets stronger from there. It gets better when she says "you know, I even thought I loved you once".
    I guess it would take me too many threads to have the complete dialog.:)
    Thanks again. I'm glad I learned a new expression.
     

    emma42

    Senior Member
    British English
    I'd just like to say that "bold-faced lie" is not current in British English.

    It's "bare-faced" or "bare-face", the latter because it is an abbreviation of the former, in my view. It takes too much effort to pronounce the "d" in "faced".
     

    marget

    Senior Member
    LV4-26 said:
    No, that, I've got. Strangely, I understand each and every word up to :
    "Yeah, well, you can call it what you want"
    (except maybe a couple of character names).
    After that, I get some words here and there (including Phil's very last words above), but on the whole, Sharon speaks faster and her cockney (?) accent gets stronger from there. It gets better when she says "you know, I even thought I loved you once".
    I guess it would take me too many threads to have the complete dialog.:)
    Thanks again. I'm glad I learned a new expression.
    There's one expression I can't get when Sharon speaks, but here's what I've heard:

    A ............who can't hold his his hands up for what he's done. A ...........who needs hired help. You'd never catch your Grant being so pathetic. You'd die of shame first.

    Was it just Sharon's lines there or can I guess at more lines for you?;)

    (I think I have an easier time with French!):)
     

    David_Porta

    Member
    American English
    ... bold faced lie is more common in the US.
    It is? I'm American, and it is 2013, and I heard "bold-faced lie" for the first time ever just now on youtube. Of these two, "bald-faced" is the only construction I have ever known in my 58+ years. Also "bare-faced lie," the construction which launched this thread, and it means quite the same thing. But "bold-faced" is a surprise. Luther said, "Sin boldly," and I can see the tie-in with lying boldly, but the "faced" is what makes this construction sound so odd to my ear when combined with "bold."

    I am wondering if it is regional or generational.

    Or has "bold-faced lie" been around a really long time and equal to "bald-faced lie" in frequency of usage, but it just didn't cross my path?
     

    JamesM

    Senior Member
    The Corpus of Contemporary American English is a good place to do a quick check on frequency, at least in the media. "Bald-faced lie" has 29 instances in the 450-million-word compendium of media from 1990 to 2012 and "bold-faced lie" has 10 instances. This compares to "bare-faced lie" having only one instance.

    I don't know if one is a modification of the other.
     
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    natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    James, I think there are more instances of barefaced lie in COCA if you spell it without the hyphen. Still in the minority, but not such a minor minority!

    (I'd never heard of bald-faced or bold-faced before reading this thread.)
     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    Bald-faced lie is very familiar; I've never heard bold-faced lie.

    Added: Oh, and barefaced lie is familiar.
     
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    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    Try this ngram which shows that the only one with any traction (other than barefaced/bare-faced) is bald-faced, and that is only over the last 60-70 years. If you play with the language selector, you will also see that it is definitely an AE thing.
     

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    'Barefaced' is one word. The standard expression here is 'a barefaced lie'.
    You can say that, but the ngram I linked to doesn't support you - barefaced is more common than bare-faced, but the ratio is about 2:1, so you can't say "it's standard". The OED gives examples of both, including Dickens's sentence in Oliver Twist: Of all the artful and designing orphans..you are one of the most bare-facedest.

    Also, standard for who? AE is very much more inclined to use bald-faced - more than twice as likely as bare-faced and barefaced combined.
     

    David_Porta

    Member
    American English
    I was watching some John Wayne movies on DVD recently, and one, The Sea Chase, I think, has a line of dialog that is clearly "bald-faced lie," but the closed-caption renders it as "bold-faced lie," so I guess ears will hear what makes sense to the mind.

    In high school too many decades ago I was transcribing a taped interview, and I rendered "change of venue" as "change of menu" because I was ignorant of both the word "venue" and the phrase "change of venue."

    Lord, I hope my error has not been repeated by others enough to corrupt that phrase as well.
     
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