a bath or a shower?

atito

Member
arabic
Hey!
Someone could tell me exactely what is the difference between these words?
And when we can use each of them.
Thank you and don't hesitate to correct me if you find errors!
 
  • cuchuflete

    Senior Member
    EEUU-inglés
    atito said:
    Hey!
    Someone couldWould someone please tell me exactely what is the difference is between these words?
    And When we can use each of them.
    Thank you and don't hesitate to correct me if you find errors!
    You soak, somewhat submerged, in a bath.

    A shower involves water spraying or pouring on you from above.
     

    GenJen54

    Senior Member
    USA - English
    Cuchu is correct. When you "take a bath," you usually sit in a tub(bathtub) filled with water. When you "take a shower," you normally stand up and let water spray on you from a faucet located in the wall above your head.

    Another note is the grammatical use of each:

    I'm going to take a shower [shower = noun].
    I'm going to take a bath [bath = noun].

    In AE, however:

    I'm going to shower. [shower = verb].
    I'm going to bathe. [bathe = verb].

    In British English, however, I believe bath can also be a verb.

    Typically, people use "take a bath/shower."
     

    clapec

    Senior Member
    Italian
    atito said:
    Hey!
    Could someone tell me exactly what the difference between these words is?
    And when can we use each of them.
    Thank you and don't hesitate to correct me if you find errors!
    Bath = a large container for water in which you sit to wash your body;
    To have a bath = to wash the whole of your body when you sit or lie in a bath filled with water.

    Shower = a piece of equipment that produces a spray of water that you stand under to wash;
    To have a shower = an act of washing yourself by standing over a shower.
     

    atito

    Member
    arabic
    nycphotography said:
    And (in AE) Bathing can be either a shower or a bath while taking a shower or a bath is specific. Although the verb to bathe has fallen almost completely out of use.
    Do you mean that we only use those days take a bath or a shower?
     
    nycphotography said:
    Right.

    In AE, we tend to say "I need a bath. I want a shower. I'm going to take a shower. But very seldom "I'm going to bathe".

    In BrE we usually say, 'I'm going to have a bath' or I'm going to have a shower.'

    GenJen You are right about BrE using 'bath' as a verb, as in 'I'm going to bath the baby.' Always remember, though, not to 'throw the baby out with the bath water' - a recent topic which caused a great deal of mirth.

    NYPC 'I'm going to bathe' is very British and very archaic. It used to refer to 'going for a swim', for which event gentlemen had to don their bathing drawers and ladies their voluminous, cover-all bathing costumes.


    LRV
     

    aridra

    Member
    India
    Suppose one has to bathe in a river, a lake or the sea (actually bathe ..not just swim, as when one is out camping for example), would you still not use the verb 'to bathe?' ?
     

    marget

    Senior Member
    Suppose one has to bathe in a river, a lake or the sea (actually bathe ..not just swim, as when one is out camping for example), would you still not use the verb 'to bathe?' ?


    Maybe, but we could also say "get washed"
     

    GenJen54

    Senior Member
    USA - English
    Marget said:
    Maybe, but we could also say "get washed"
    Huh? "get washed up" maybe. (And where I live that would be "get warshed up). I've not heard of "get washed," as in:

    I'm going to step in the river and get washed.
    I'm going to get washed in the lake.

    Perhaps the "up" is a regional add-on. I can't imagine getting washed without it.

    Another nuance, to "get washed up," does not necessarily mean a full bath. It could simply mean to "get cleaned up," say, after gardening or performing some other "dirty" task.

    Further "to get washed up" is completely different from "to be washed up," which is the subject of its own thread.

    I believe aridra is onto something. Bathe - as in a river, in a lake, etc. is still somewhat common.

    She bathed in the nearby stream before getting into her sleeping bag.

    We watched restlessly as several young bears bathed in the river next to our campsite.

    I've seen several cardinals bathe in the birdbath after the rain.

    We also use bathe to describe the activity of lying in the sun. (See the link I added in m post # 12, above).
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    Get washed - is what I do to clean myself.
    Any washed with an up after it is about the dishes, not me.

    Are you going to get washed now?
    Is a question about me, and whether or not I am about to clean myself.

    Are you going to wash up now?
    Is a question about the dirty dishes and whether or not I am going to wash them.
     

    aridra

    Member
    India
    With reference to the verb bathe being 'almost completely out of use' in one of the posts above, do the following used of 'bathe / bathed' seem old-fashioned to you? I must be very old-fashioned, they seem fine to me :)

    1. She was bathed in sweat after the work-out.
    2. Bathe the wound in a disinfectant before dressing it.
    3. You need to bathe the baby in lukewarm water.
     

    elroy

    Imperfect Mod
    US English/Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    panjandrum said:
    Get washed - is what I do to clean myself.
    Any washed with an up after it is about the dishes, not me.

    Are you going to get washed now?
    Is a question about me, and whether or not I am about to clean myself.

    Are you going to wash up now?
    Is a question about the dirty dishes and whether or not I am going to wash them.
    The Oxford English Dictionary lists "to wash oneself, one's hands, etc." as one of the meanings of "wash up" and identifies it as U.S. usage.

    See 3j. and o. under "wash, v."
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    So, wash up in the UK means to wash dishes.
    Wash up in the US means to wash oneself, one's hands etc.

    That's perhaps because all US homes have mechanical dishwashers.
     

    Isotta

    Senior Member
    English, Hodgepodge
    nycphotography said:
    Right.

    In AE, we tend to say "I need a bath. I want a shower. I'm going to take a shower. But very seldom "I'm going to bathe".
    But one does hear in AE something like, "I swear, that kid never bathes, " or, "Bless her heart, I don't think she bathes regularly."
     

    TrentinaNE

    Senior Member
    USA
    English (American)
    panjandrum said:
    So, wash up in the UK means to wash dishes.
    Wash up in the US means to wash oneself, one's hands etc.

    I've heard wash up refer to dishes, etc. in AE. It depends on *gasp* the context. ;)

    Elizabeth
     

    Brioche

    Senior Member
    Australia English
    aridra said:
    With reference to the verb bathe being 'almost completely out of use' in one of the posts above, do the following used of 'bathe / bathed' seem old-fashioned to you? I must be very old-fashioned, they seem fine to me :)

    1. She was bathed in sweat after the work-out.
    2. Bathe the wound in a disinfectant before dressing it.
    3. You need to bathe the baby in lukewarm water.
    All of those are fine.

    However, in number 3, it would mean you were putting water over the baby to soothe, rather than to clean.
     
    In my archaeology career I spent years mostly 'living rough' in a tent, on the edge of various fields out in the wilds. Washing facilities were limited, to say the least. My partner and I had to make do with sharing a bowl of cold water. When we were extra mucky from our exertions we could opt to be hosed down before leaving the excavation site. This happened during my 'nudist era' so it was all very natural and nobody was shocked.

    On one occasion, in Yugoslavia, a torrential rain storm occurred during the night so we leapt out, armed with soap and shampoo, and enjoyed a wonderful free shower (in the dark). Shades of Lady Chatterley and Mellors. ;)

    If ever we chanced to be near a river we would go in and 'have a wash'.

    At one location the landlady of the local pub was good enough to allow us free access to her bathroom facilities. 'You're welcome to have a bath any time you wish,' she said. She laid on a goodly supply of soaps, shampoos, towels, etc. Bliss!

    'Washing up' applied only to washing the dishes. If we needed a quick wash, after a mucky job, we would say, 'I need to go and clean myself up a bit.'

    Years later, when my sons were given their pre-bed bath, my elder son said one evening, 'You can leave us alone now Mummy, we're old enough to bath ourselves.' I let them get on with it but left the door open and stood nearby, for safety reasons. Two boisterous young boys, alone in a bath, means trouble!


    LRV
     

    atito

    Member
    arabic
    Thank you all for these explanations I am reading and try to get the usage in every country!!! I didn't expect to see all this differences but it helps especially the differences between BE and AE !!!
    Other comments are always welcome!
     

    cirrus

    Senior Member
    UK English
    Interesting I hadn't realised there was such a diversity around washing. What would people call a Florence Nightingale? This is a standing up wash where you strip off in the bathroom for a wash but don't get in the shower or bath.

    Florence Nightingale was a nurse who became famous during the Crimean War in the 19C. She is supposed to have said that to get properly clean all she needed was a cup of water, some soap and some privacy.
     

    maxiogee

    Banned
    English
    cirrus said:
    Interesting I hadn't realised there was such a diversity around washing. What would people call a Florence Nightingale? This is a wash where you strip off in the bathroom for a wash but don't get in the shower or bath.
    Sounds like a self-administered bed-less bed-bath! :D


    She is supposed to have said that to get properly clean all she needed was a cup of water, some soap and some privacy.
    Yes, but she was a gentlewoman, how dirty did she ever get in the first place?;)
     
    cirrus said:
    Interesting I hadn't realised there was such a diversity around washing. What would people call a Florence Nightingale? This is a wash where you strip off in the bathroom for a wash but don't get in the shower or bath.

    Florence Nightingale was a nurse who became famous during the Crimean War in the 19C. She is supposed to have said that to get properly clean all she needed was a cup of water, some soap and some privacy.
    I would call that 'a strip wash', Cirrus. Very handy when you don't want to get all steamed up.

    Florence Nightingale was without doubt a lady of noble and admirable qualities. A heroine who founded the nursing movement. But a cup of water and soap to get properly clean? Until I've tried it for myself I reserve judgment.


    LRV
     

    GenJen54

    Senior Member
    USA - English
    cirrus said:
    What would people call a Florence Nightingale? This is a standing up wash where you strip off in the bathroom for a wash but don't get in the shower or bath.
    I've not heard of "Florence Nightingale" used to describe this type of bath.

    We usually say "sponge bath," "rag bath," or even "whore's bath."

    Even though we generally use rags for this type of "bathing" (a general wipe-down with a wet rag and bit of soap), the most common name is "sponge bath." Sponge baths are also "given" to patients in hospitals.

    I have also heard "rag bath," although I do not use it.

    The aforementioned "whore's bath" I suppose, came from a time when a prostitute would have to clean herself between...erm..."tricks."
     
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