a beautiful garden

mimi2

Senior Member
vietnam vietnamese
Hi,
1. The hotel room looked out a beautiful garden.
Is this sentence correct? When "over" is added to the sentence, I don't know where the garden is. Please show me.
2. The hotel room looked out over a beautiful garden.
Thank you.
 
  • Matching Mole

    Senior Member
    England, English
    You must use a prep. such as over or onto. Usually "over" if the room is on a higher floor, "onto" if the view is at the same level. The garden is outside the room.

    "To look out" + noun without using a preposition is informal for to select, or find. "Will you look out those plans for me" (get them out of the file).

    So your 2. example is fine. It describes the fact that the room overlooks a garden attached to the building it is in, and is probably on an upper floor.
     

    mimi2

    Senior Member
    vietnam vietnamese
    You must use a prep. such as over or onto. Usually "over" if the room is on a higher floor, "onto" if the view is at the same level. The garden is outside the room.

    "To look out" + noun without using a preposition is informal for to select, or find. "Will you look out those plans for me" (get them out of the file).

    So your 2. example is fine. It describes the fact that the room overlooks a garden attached to the building it is in, and is probably on an upper floor.
    Hi, Matching Mole.
    It is very kind of you to help me. I understand every word you gave to me. Very helpful.
     

    Matching Mole

    Senior Member
    England, English
    "To" will work too.

    "The hotel room looked out to a beautiful garden."
    I feel this must be AE because it doesn't sound right to me, and I don't think I would use it. I can see it used on UK sites, but it doesn't seem that common. Many of these are "looks out to sea", which is something of a special case, but even then, I think I might only use even that with an animate subject.
     

    JamesM

    Senior Member
    I would only use "look out onto" or "look out on", not "look out to", in the example with the garden.

    "With a look out to the future" would work for me, but if something is overlooking something else, I'd always use "on" or "onto".
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    My back yard looks out to my swimming pool.

    My front window looks out to sunrises; my rear window looks out to sunsets.

    These sound OK to me.
     

    JamesM

    Senior Member

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    Although it's not a construction I would use, I certainly do find a lot of examples of it on the internet:

    http://www.google.com/search?sourceid=navclient&ie=UTF-8&rlz=1T4GFRC_enUS207US208&q="looks+out+to"

    It may just be a personal preference on my part. It's obvious that it's used by many people.

    To be candid, I probably would not use this either. I prefer to be more specific, and "to" is the least specific of the bunch (down, upon, up, etc.).

    I was just offering it as a possibility. Broadening the horizons so to speak.
     
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