A Belly Full Of Me

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namlan

Banned
Vietnam
- You think you're a big man, huh? You got a big mouth, I'll give you that, but do you have the guts? Well, you're going to have a belly full of me before this is over, and that's for sure.

- What does "have a belly full of me" mean here?

Thanks a lot!

NamLan
 
  • bibliolept

    Senior Member
    AE, Español
    To "have a belly full of something" is to be tired of it. Figuratively, it's as if you were forced to eat something until your stomach was full of it and didn't want any more.

    Interestingly, to "be fed up with something" functions similarly.

    A related phrase is "I can't stomach it," which in turns means that you do not find something palatable or easy to accept; rather, you object to it or can't stand it.
     

    cycloneviv

    Senior Member
    English - Australia
    Really? I think it matches pretty well with the Word Reference definition for bellyful:

    an undesirable overabundance; "a bellyful of your complaints"

    EDIT: On second thoughts, my initial reaction was that I would have written "have a belly-full", and Google certainly gives just under 66,000 results for "a bellyful" (and, by the way, around 8,000 for "a bellyfull") and over 160,000 for "a belly full" (results for which include "a belly-full") - none of which are resounding numbers of results, but still showing a preference for the original version, with or without hyphen.
     
    Last edited:

    bibliolept

    Senior Member
    AE, Español
    Really? I think it matches pretty well with the Word Reference definition for bellyful:

    an undesirable overabundance; "a bellyful of your complaints"
    Yes, it seems that "had a bellyful" is used nearly as often as "had a belly full."

    I wonder if "bellyful" isn't more common in figurative settings but I just haven't noticed.
     
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