a benchmark law

NickJunior

Senior Member
Khmer
Hi,

When a certain law is described as "benchmark", does it mean that it is historic? I thank you beforehand. Below is the context:

BAGHDAD - Iraq's parliament passed a benchmark law Saturday allowing lower-ranking former members of Saddam Hussein's Baath party to reclaim government jobs, the first major piece of U.S.-backed legislation it has adopted.
 
  • theangler

    Member
    England, English
    I would not necessarily define it as historic, rather something that can be used as a standard; a "point of reference against which things may be compared or assessed".

    So in this case it is 'benchmark' because it's the first adopted major piece of U.S.-backed legislation and thus may render further developments. IMO.
     

    RoseLilly

    Banned
    USA English
    Nick, sometimes a benchmark is a standard or base. Sometimes it's a turning point or big change. Sometimes it's historic. But here, benchmark means important, significant, key.
     

    NickJunior

    Senior Member
    Khmer
    Thank you very much, Theangler and RoseLilly. By they way when I wrote I thank you beforehand, does that sound like natural English? Please advise.
     

    Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    Thank you very much, Theangler and RoseLilly. By they way when I wrote I thank you beforehand, does that sound like natural English? Please advise.
    Hello NickJunior,

    Here is a long thread on thanks beforehand that you may find interesting. It links to discussions of other ways to say the same thing.

    ("I thank you beforehand" sounds natural to me. It is slightly formal, and I prefer it to "thanks beforehand" which is more casual. But this is only my opinion. I hope you will read the thread.)
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top