a bent of integrated modules

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The Lord of Gluttony

Senior Member
Turkish
Hi,

I came across the following sentence:

"Target is actual product-a unit, a module, a bent of integrated modules, and effective final product."
Source: An article named "Difference between Verification and Validation" on toolsqa.com (Link)

What does the word bent mean here?
I looked it up on WR Dictionary (Link) but no definition seems to fit. Perhaps, there is a fitting definition. Please help me notice and understand it if it does.

Thank you very much!
 
  • Egmont

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    It makes no sense to me either, and I have some professional experience in the area he is discussing.

    However:
    (a) there are many English errors in that part of the document. As one example, "and" in the sentence you quoted should be "an."
    (b) the writer is of Indian ancestry and is living in the Netherlands. He may not be a native speaker of standard English.

    I think the right word here is "set."
     

    dojibear

    Senior Member
    English - Northeast US
    [1] This is not a sentence. It is shortened (abbreviated). It is a bullet-item in a list. It doesn't attempt to be a correct English sentence with correct grammar.

    [2] I agree that "a bent of" means "a set of" (or "a group of").

    [3] I have no idea why "a bent" is used here. Is it local slang somewhere? Is it a mis-spelling of some word?
     

    The Lord of Gluttony

    Senior Member
    Turkish
    [1] This is not a sentence. It is shortened (abbreviated). It is a bullet-item in a list. It doesn't attempt to be a correct English sentence with correct grammar.

    [2] I agree that "a bent of" means "a set of" (or "a group of").

    [3] I have no idea why "a bent" is used here. Is it local slang somewhere? Is it a mis-spelling of some word?
    That's what I suspected. Thank y'all very much.
     
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