A big batch of grains

Me2U

New Member
Russian
In the text about healthy eating that I am translating I came across a phrase "a batch of grains". It is used in the context of cooking in bulk.
"Make dried beans in a crock pot. Make a big batch of grains, or keep corn meal on hand to make quick-cook polenta." What does "a batch of grains" mean? Is it something like a big pan of porridge cooked for the whole week? Porridge made of one or several types of grain? Several portions of different types of grain cooked in bulk?
Thank you.
 
  • entangledbank

    Senior Member
    English - South-East England
    I'd understand it as types of grain, and cooked: rice, lentils, barley, or whatever you like, with their longer cooking time, so that later they can be added to things quickly.
     

    Barque

    Senior Member
    Tamil
    A batch in this context just means a certain quantity. A big batch is a large quantity.

    The reference to grains suggests that the writer means different types of grains.

    Cross-posted.
     

    Me2U

    New Member
    Russian
    So, are the different types of grain cooked in one pan together? Or every type separately? Sorry for the stupid question :)
     

    entangledbank

    Senior Member
    English - South-East England
    'A big batch' suggests only one act of cooking. It depends how fussy you are. I just throw them all in a pot and boil them until they beg for mercy, but others might want different times for different grains.
     

    Me2U

    New Member
    Russian
    Thanks everyone. Yes, cooking it all in one pot makes more sense. To cook several types of grain each in its own pot seems like a whole lot of work to do on a Sunday :) And it should be 1-3 types of grain, if it's all cooked together, otherwise it would be quite a mess :) I hope I got it right...
     

    Sparky Malarky

    Moderator
    English - US
    What the author is saying is:
    Lots of grains take a long time to cook. So when you are going to cook some, make a lot of them. Then you will have leftovers and can use those leftovers in other recipes without have to spend a long time cooking the grains again.

    He goes on to give an example of cooking dried beans in a crock pot. This takes many hours. You won't want to do this every day, so if you need a small amount of beans, go ahead and cook a lot. Save the rest of the cooked beans in the refrigerator and use them in other dishes.
     

    Me2U

    New Member
    Russian
    What the author is saying is:
    Lots of grains take a long time to cook. So when you are going to cook some, make a lot of them. Then you will have leftovers and can use those leftovers in other recipes without have to spend a long time cooking the grains again.

    He goes on to give an example of cooking dried beans in a crock pot. This takes many hours. You won't want to do this every day, so if you need a small amount of beans, go ahead and cook a lot. Save the rest of the cooked beans in the refrigerator and use them in other dishes.
    Thanks a lot! You've made it very clear. I didn't even realize beans were grains :) Then of course it makes sense to cook them for the whole week.
     
    The botanical definition given above by Wikepedia is just a scientific starting point.

    Even so, they immediately start dividing these kinds of foodstuffs into two separate categories, cereals and legumes.

    Beans are legumes. They are not "grains" in common usage, and particularly not in culinary terms.

    A grain of rice? One little flat cereal particle? Yes. :thumbsup:

    A grain of a chickpea? :confused::thumbsdown: A grain of a pinto bean? :confused::thumbsdown:

    So, Me2U, beans are not grains.:D
     

    Me2U

    New Member
    Russian
    So beans may not be grains after all :) My Eng-Rus dictionary agrees with that. And it was helpful to know that when people say "grains" they may be referring to just one kind of grain. I wonder what type of grain(s) the author had in mind when she talked about cooking a big batch of it. I can only think of rice and buckwheat (well, you probably don't eat buckwheat too much, but we here do)) Oh, and pearl barley maybe...
     

    Sparky Malarky

    Moderator
    English - US
    Me2U, I think I led you astray by implying that beans are grains. Your original quote doesn't even say this. It actually says:

    (1)"Make dried beans in a crock pot. and (2) Make a big batch of grains...."

    The author is giving you two examples (one with beans, one with grains) of items you can cook in bulk.
     

    Me2U

    New Member
    Russian
    Me2U, I think I led you astray by implying that beans are grains. Your original quote doesn't even say this. It actually says:

    (1)"Make dried beans in a crock pot. and (2) Make a big batch of grains...."

    The author is giving you two examples (one with beans, one with grains) of items you can cook in bulk.
    Sparky Malarky, it's all right! Really the context might seem a bit misleading. A bigger problem will be to find a normal-sounding equivalent of the "big batch of grains" in Russian. Even though I now know what it is (thanks again to everyone!) I'll have a hard time putting this notion into my native language. But this is an issue to be discussed in another place :)
     

    Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    If I were only cooking only one sort, such as barley, I would say say cook a 'big batch of barley/ the grain'.
    Then we have the term 'pulses', meaning everything edible that grows in a pod - peas, beans, lentils.
     
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