A big doubt

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Sairus

New Member
Italian Italy
Hi all. A big doubt, what is correct between:

I'm going to ask the group of students who is going to have a class exchange with an italian school...

or

I'm going to ask the group of students who are going to have a class exchange with an italian school...

???

Thanks :)
 
  • Eltheza

    Senior Member
    English - England (Midlands)
    Hi!

    "... the group of students who are ..."

    The verb depends on students (plural).

    I'm not a native speaker, so I'm grateful for all the advice ...;-))!
     

    cropje_jnr

    Senior Member
    English - Australia
    Both could be correct, but the meaning is different.

    In the first sentence, you are asking who is going to do an exchange. You are putting this question to the group of students.

    In the second sentence, the group of students are doing the exchange. You could replace "who are" with "which is" or "which are" and keep the same meaning.

    Note that Italian must be capitalised in English in all contexts.
     

    nzfauna

    Senior Member
    New Zealand, English
    You could argue for both, with some changes...

    The first focusses on one group as a whole.
    "I'm going to ask the GROUP of students THAT IS going to have a class exchange with an italian school..."


    The second highlights the individuals in the group.
    "I'm going to ask the group of STUDENDS WHO ARE going to have a class exchange with an italian school..."
     
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