a big puffy puff

Super Saiyan

Senior Member
Cantonese
Hi, in the book titled ‘come to my house’ by Theo. Lesieg.

There’s a sentence ‘I sleep in a bed with a big puffy puff. Come over some night, we have puff puffs enough.’

There are 3 puffs here.

Puff means a small amount of smoke, air that can rise in the air. So I don’t get what puffy puff. Soft smoke? Puff puffs. I am confused.

Can anyone please explain? Thanks
 
  • baldpate

    Senior Member
    UK, English
    In this context, a "puff" (noun) is a quilted bed cover, a duvet.

    "puffy" (adjective) descibes the lightweight, airy fluffy character of a "puff".
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    I found this picture:
    IMGP7494.JPG


    It supports baldpate's suggestion that "puff" is a child's word for duvet (BrE)/comforter (AmE).
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    Given this is an American author (aka Theodore Geisel aka Dr Seuss) writing in 1966, I think it's much more likely that they are pillows.
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    We have puff puffs enough. What is puff puffs here? Thanks
    It's just a doubling of the word "puff" - children's language often has repetitions, like "chuff chuff" for train.

    (I still think that the term refers to comforters, myself: the blue & white checked item is the most prominent thing in the picture;).)
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    He's pointing at the pillow. Comforters were not that common here then, duvets unheard of. I never saw a duvet until I visited Europe in 1977. My mother knew what they were - feather ticks - from visiting her grandmother's house.
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    My guess would be pillows, too. But I obviously I can't be certain due to the lack of full context.
     

    baldpate

    Senior Member
    UK, English
    I was also guided, in part, by the picture - but mainly by this entry in the Oxford English Dictionary
    North American regional (chiefly New England). A lightweight bed-covering filled with down, etc.; a quilted coverlet or duvet.
     

    GreenWhiteBlue

    Senior Member
    USA - English
    I was also guided, in part, by the picture - but mainly by this entry in the Oxford English Dictionary
    I see that the dictionary cites this as "chiefly New England." It should be noted that Geisel (Lesieg/Seuss) grew up in Springfield, Massachusetts, and went to college at Dartmouth in New Hampshire, which are both in New England.
     

    Roxxxannne

    Senior Member
    English (northeastern US)
    'Puff' is definitely a New England word for an especially fluffy comforter, and comforters have been in existence in New England since long before Theodore Geisel was born.
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    That makes sense. I've never lived in New England and never heard a comforter called a puff. I wonder how many millions of people have read that without having heard that term either.
     
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