A bit of a [something]

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Ehsan3211

New Member
Persian
Hi everybody!
I have problem with The meaning of underlined word in following sentence,could anybody explain that for me?
Thanks

Henry was a bit of a leader this afternoon, because the other two
were Percival and Johnny, the smallest boys on the island.
 
  • Ehsan3211

    New Member
    Persian
    Three were playing here now. Henry was the biggest of them. He
    was also a distant relative of that other boy whose mulberry-marked
    face had not been seen since the evening of the great fire; but he was
    not old enough to understand this, and if he had been told that the
    other boy had gone home in an aircraft, he would have accepted the
    statement without fuss or disbelief.
    Henry was a bit of a leader this afternoon, because the other two
    were Percival and Johnny, the smallest boys on the island.

    Lord of the Flies
     

    PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    Thanks.

    Henry was a bit of a leader this afternoon -> Henry could perhaps be called a leader this afternoon [with the implication that this was not his normal position in the group.]

    To be a bit of a <noun> -> to have a slight but justifiable resemblance to a <noun>; to have a resemblance, in a small way/manner, to a <noun>.
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Oxford says of “a bit of a ……” — Used to suggest that something is not severe or extreme, or is the case only to a limited extent.

    Typical examples:
    That’s a bit of an exaggeration / The exams are a bit of a nightmare. / It was a bit of a suprirse to see you here.
     
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