a bit of Freud, a bit of Shae Rags.

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hard to get named

New Member
Chinese
"We can stand here and feel sorry for him,
a bit of Freud, a bit of Shae Rags.
..or we can find him."

What is "a bit of Freud, a bit of Shae Rags."?

I saw this in the the 4th episode of the 2016 British-American tv series Paranoid at around 0:25:42I can't find anything about what "Shae Rags” means so I am confused about the meaning of "a bit of Freud, a bit of Shae Rags." please kindly explain.
 
  • london calling

    Senior Member
    UK English
    It was 'Shakerags' - a informal name or 'nickname' for Shakespeare.
    Blimey, that's one for Shakespeare scholars, as it seems that the only person to have called him that was an apparently very jealous chap by the name of William Kemp.

    By the way hard to get named, when you write a post please ensure that you specify that you are asking about something you think you heard (as is obviously the case here) rather than something you have come across in a written text.
     

    Bluegurl

    New Member
    English
    It was 'Shakerags' - a informal name or 'nickname' for Shakespeare.
    Actually, in this circumstance, I believe the quote has nothing to do with Shakespeare. The actual definition of the word us "an unruly or unkempt person" which, in the context of the show (just watched this actually) makes much more sense.
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    Welcome to the forum, Bluegurl. :)

    It would be really helpful for anyone reading this old thread if you could tell us a little about the context. The OP neglected to do that, unfortunately.

    Why was Freud mentioned at all? I don't challenge your interpretation, since I haven't seen the series, but the idea that two famous men are being referenced (Freud and Shakespeare) appeals to me.:)
     

    Bluegurl

    New Member
    English
    Welcome to the forum, Bluegurl. :)

    It would be really helpful for anyone reading this old thread if you could tell us a little about the context. The OP neglected to do that, unfortunately.

    Why was Freud mentioned at all? I don't challenge your interpretation, since I haven't seen the series, but the idea that two famous men are being referenced (Freud and Shakespeare) appeals to me.:)
    Thanks for the welcome! The show is a British crime drama and they are trying to track down a "Ghost Detective". Basically, its a person who's extremely secretive and unknonwn and who's investigating the same crime that the detectives are and sending hints to the detectives but is actually hurting the investigation. One detective is trying to discuss motive and the lead detective says "We can stand here and feel sorry for him,a bit of Freud, a bit of shakerags...or we can find him." Which I believe she's basically saying, "Im sure there's a reason thats in part psychological and part just a delusional outcast. the reason for his motivation is irrelavant, we just need to find him". Only in a much more interesting way :]
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    Thank you for the helpful background information. :)

    Still, I think it's likely that the speaker meant "we can stand around trying to analyse him (like Freud) and understand his motivation (like Shakespeare)...or we can get out there and find him.
     

    Scott AM

    Senior Member
    English - Canada
    I personally think that "shakerags" meaning "Shakespeare" is pretty obscure, even compared to "shakerags", the obsolete insult. Using it to mean "Shakespeare" might not even be correct. So I agree with Bluegurl on this one. The detectives are describing the person they are investigating, not their own approach to the case.
     
    I'm getting in on this thread quite late.... I'm really behind in my Netflix queue! what can I say!?
    but I got to that exact same line of dialogue in the Paranoid episode & needed to find out the meaning of "Shakerags" too...
    I'm going to side with the Shakespeare hypothesis over the "unkempt person" definition for 2 reasons:
    1) In the English subtitles, they write "Shakerags" capitalized, which leads me to believe it's a name.
    2) In the preceeding episodes the detectives have an inside joke of bantering Shakespearean quotes to each other back & forth, so the evocation of Shakespeare again here would be thematic.
     

    ain'ttranslationfun?

    Senior Member
    US English
    I actually meant, not 'might they have said that', but 'could they have alteratively said "Shake-scene"' given the frequent references to The Bard? I'll trust your ears, though; 'Shakerags' it probably was!
     
    Last edited:
    I actually meant not 'might they have said that', but 'could they have alteratively said "Shake-scene"' given the frequent references to The Bard? I'll trust your ears, though; 'Shakerags' it probably was!
    I've learned not to completely trust my recollections.. that's why I take tons of notes at work & double check stuff.. . woe be me (or the defendant!) if I ever have to testify in a court of law!
     

    Cee1

    New Member
    English
    As Alec (one of the characters) often references Shakespeare and Nina asks in the next episode if there is a Shakespeare quote for everything, it might be Shakespeare that is being referenced along with Freud.
     
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