a bit on the indulgent side

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kansi

Senior Member
japanese
These banana blueberry pancakes are vegan and gluten free. Nutritionally speaking they are a bit on the indulgent side, but who doesn't love a good weekend treat. Make sure the bananas are really ripe to get the best flavour. If they are covered in brown spots, they are good to go. If you're looking for an eggy version with maca, these might be for you.

sydney health blog — BLOG — Wholesome Stef

Does "a bit on the indulgent side" mean "a little indulgent", thus that part means "Nutritionally speaking they are a little indulgent,"?
 
  • Chez

    Senior Member
    English English
    Yes, it means 'a bit/little indulgent'.

    And they are nutritionally indulgent because they are fairly high in calories, so not entirely 'healthy' (in large quantities).
     

    kansi

    Senior Member
    japanese
    Yes, it means 'a bit/little indulgent'.

    And they are nutritionally indulgent because they are fairly high in calories, so not entirely 'healthy' (in large quantities).
    I see..then I thought just writing so is simple and fine.I wonder why the writer used that.

    a bit on the indulgent side sounds more literary?
     

    Chez

    Senior Member
    English English
    It's not so much literary, as having a 'light touch' (it's not humorous, exactly, but it doesn't sound like it is criticising very seriously').

    We use this structure quite a lot e.g:

    That cake was very nice, but it was a bit on the sweet side for me.
    The film was good, but it was a bit on the long side for my liking.

    It 'lightens up/softens' the criticism.
     

    kansi

    Senior Member
    japanese
    It 'lightens up/softens' the criticism.
    Compared to simply saying "a little indulgent", it lightens up/softens the criticism?

    The very first sentence when I found this phrase is this.Do you know what this means?
    ・Sundays Beach Club in Uluwatu may feel to be a bit on the indulgent side,but the beach views make it all worth it.
     

    Chez

    Senior Member
    English English
    As I'm sure you're aware, 'a little indulgent' is not a strongly critical phrase, but using 'on the indulgent side' has a slightly humorous 'feel' to it which works well, for example in this case where the author is saying 'it's not ideal nutritionally but, hey it won't hurt you to have pancakes for a treat now and again'.

    It is not a definitive degree of lighter/stronger criticism, it is a style choice which, along with the whole context can give the writing a lighter feel.
     

    Chez

    Senior Member
    English English
    'lighter/softer'

    It does not have a specific entertaining/cheerful effect, it just sounds 'friendlier'. I really can't pin it down any further. It is about style and is something that can only be learned by exposure to English styles, not by defining it super-precisely.
     

    kansi

    Senior Member
    japanese
    ❶It does not have a specific entertaining/cheerful effect, ❷it just sounds 'friendlier'.
    I understand all you explained but this part. Are you saying here ❶ is slightly different from ❷ like it just sounds familier , but not entertaining or cheerful? Or ❶ and ❷ are completely different?
     
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