A bit on the nose

Necsus

Senior Member
Italian (Italy)
Hi everybody. I've already opened a thread in Italian/English and different suggestions are provided, so I'm wondering if you can help me to better understand the meaning of the expression 'a bit on the nose' in this context.
From 'Desperate Housewives' series. Bob and Lee, two gay friends, are giving a Halloween party, Katherine arrives, disguised as Queen Marie Antoinette, and these are the lines:

LEE - You came as a self-important queen who lost all her power? Isn't that a bit on the nose?
KATHERINE - Lee making jokes about a queen. Isn't that a bit ironic?

Thank you for your suggestions!
 
  • Trisia

    Senior Member
    Romanian
    From The Free Dictionary:

    on the nose Exactly; precisely: predicted the final score on the nose.

    I think Marie Antoinette had a bit of a long nose, too.

    [Her costume was presenting too well what she really was (self-important...) and there's also a little reference to the queen's nose]
     

    Necsus

    Senior Member
    Italian (Italy)
    Okay, thanks. So in practice it means that the costume/ character is accurate, appropriate, the same as her true self?
    And since they are all homosexuals, maybe is it also possible a double meaning queen/ drag queen in the line of Katherine?
     

    nichec

    Senior Member
    Chinese(Taiwan)/English(AE)
    Okay, thanks. So in practice it means that the costume/ character is accurate, appropriate, the same as her true self?
    And since they are all homosexuals, maybe is it also possible a double meaning queen/ drag queen in the line of Katherine?
    The word "queen" definitely has double meanings, at least to me.
     

    Teafrog

    Senior Member
    UK English (& rusty French…)
    According to this, I think it means something like "exactly right", as Teafrog noted.
    I have to return the crown to Trisia - see post #2.
    I put forward "on the button", "spot on" as further alternatives. How this all fits with an American sit-com, I don't know. I never watch soaps or sit-coms (UK, US, Oz) so I cannot comment on this sort of humour or logic :(
     

    nichec

    Senior Member
    Chinese(Taiwan)/English(AE)
    I have to return the crown to Trisia - see post #2.
    I put forward "on the button", "spot on" as further alternatives. How this all fits with an American sit-com, I don't know. I never watch soaps or sit-coms (UK, US, Oz) so I cannot comment on this sort of humour or logic :(
    The word "queen" can easily be understood (see 3 and 7)

    http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=queen

    (I don't watch soaps either, mind you, frog :D)

    Trisia, kid, I am sorry I forgot to mention you in my last post. As my best friend, I know you will forgive me. :D
     

    Trisia

    Senior Member
    Romanian
    So, the way I see it, we're all right :D (what do you mean, crown? Is this some sort of reference to a queen? :p)

    The guy tells her she dressed to fit exactly her situation, and I do think he chose that precise phrase (instead of Teafrog's excelent suggestions) to add a little joke on Marie Antoinette's nose.
    She answers that he, as a homosexual, should be the last to make fun of "queens."


    P.S. Nichec, you lovely person, you know you didn't have to apologise :D
     
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