a bite to eat

Status
Not open for further replies.

Daffodil100

Senior Member
Chinese
I got an email from my American co-worker, actually he is my superviser. He suggested after work we eat something together.

I would like to suggest we meet after work maybe for a bite to eat?
Is it appropriate if I reply, "It'll be definitely a pleasure for me to nosh together with you after work"? If no, what is the better and polite answer? I guess a bite to eat is just a snack, so I choose "nosh", but I am not sure because "nosh" is slang. I was told it should be careful for non-native speakers when it comes to the usage of slang.

Thanks!
 
Last edited:
  • Matching Mole

    Senior Member
    England, English
    I think your topic is actually about "nosh", isn't it, rather than "a bite to eat"?

    Nosh is slang in Britain (and rather comical) and, apparently, informal in the US. In the UK it refers to eating generally, including large amounts; in the US it apparently refers to snacks. I know your correspondent is American, but I would avoid it. However, let us see what US English speakers say.

    There is a topic on nosh here:
    [Slang] nosh
     

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    I think (i) 'nosh' is losing it's currency; it sounds a little contrived and (ii) it is far more common as a noun than a verb and (iii) it is far more informal than "a bite to eat" so I would avoid its use.

    If you insist, then the reply would be far less formal: "I'd be happy to have some nosh with you after work!"
     

    Daffodil100

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    Hello Matching Mole and PaulQ,

    Thank you for your helpful replies. I don't have a preference on choosing "nosh". If I say I'll be happy to have some food with you, would it, I mean"have food", sound too dry? Or it would be okay?

    I am just looking for appropriate words to answer it politely. Either British English or American one is fine for me.

    Could either of you help me again? Many thanks!
     
    Last edited:

    quillerbee

    Senior Member
    Canadian English
    Hi Daff, since you asked, I will say, No, DO NOT use nosh, it is way way too casual for business use. And the point of the meeting is to meet, not to eat, right? So say you would be happy to meet or get together. (off-topic note: If you are female, be very very careful about meeting privately with your supervisor.)
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    In American English, we most often say "to nosh on something." I can't remember ever hearing "to nosh together." It's informal, but so is "a bite to eat" (he probably means dinner rather than a snack). Many Americans would associate it with Jewish/Yiddish speech patterns and might find it a little odd coming from you (unless you use that sort of slang a lot).

    Hopefully, it's not too far off topic to suggest that a better answer in American English would be something like "Yes, that's fine.", "Yes, that sounds good.", or "No, I can't tonight." rather than parroting back the entire question with lots of "politeness" added to it.
     

    Matching Mole

    Senior Member
    England, English
    Hello Matching Mole and PaulQ,

    Thank you for your helpful replies. I don't have a preference on choosing "nosh". If I say I'll be happy to have some food with you, would it, I mean"have food", sound too dry? Or it would be okay?

    I am just looking for appropriate words to answer it politely. Either British English or American one is fine for me.

    Could either of you help me again? Many thanks!
    I'm sorry, we can't make suggestions of alternative ways of saying something. You must supply specific words or phrases in context for us to discuss (as you did with "nosh", for example). Each thread may only have one such topic.

    I'm therefore closing this thread.
     
    Status
    Not open for further replies.
    < Previous | Next >
    Top