a blank handicapped insistence following the sun

MaryamSeresht

Senior Member
Persian
Hello,

Please tell your idea about this sentence:

"Mostly he sat on a folding chair, silently moving an expressionless face like a sunflower, blank handicapped insistence following the sun, the only goal left in his life to match the two, the orb of his face and the orb of light."

May I translate the red part like this: he moved his blank handicapped-like face insistently toward the sun.
Am I correct?

Your help is much appreciated.

It's part of Inheritance of Loss, a novel by Kiran Desai.
 
  • PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    No. the [blank handicapped insistence] is to be treated as a phrase in which all or nothing should be replaced. The sentence has several implied words omitted:
    "Mostly he sat on a folding chair, silently moving an expressionless face like a sunflower, [like a sunflower there was a] blank handicapped insistence [to his face] following the sun, the only goal left in his life to match the two, the orb of his face and the orb of light."
     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    "Mostly he sat on a folding chair, silently moving an expressionless face like a sunflower, [with its/with a] blank[,] handicapped insistence [on] following the sun, the only goal left in his life to match the two, the orb of his face and the orb of light."

    The insistence is handicapped in the sense that it has no other choice in the matter of its face following the sun -- it is an imperative, like a paralyzed man's inability to walk away from his wheelchair.

    Edit: Slowly cross-posted with PaulQ as I tapped this out on my phone. :)
     
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