a blast from the '70s

fadeout32811!!!

Senior Member
french
Hi,

I am watching "The Great British Bake off" and there is a line that I don't understand.
In a scene, a MC is talking to one of the participants.
The MC says, that the participant's Swiss roll went down really well.
And the participant replies "Oh, yeah. It's a blast from the '70s"

I don't understand what they are talking about.
Would someone explain please?


Thank you very much!
 
  • suzi br

    Senior Member
    English / England
    That phrase is used to indicate that something is rather old-fashioned, or is inspired by fashions from the past.

    We can just say "a blast from the past" or be more specific and indicate a specific decade or other time period. In this case the baker mentions the 70s. The idea is that swiss rolls were popular in the 70s (and are not very fashionable now).
     

    dojibear

    Senior Member
    English - Northeast US
    I think the only reason the expression became popular is that "blast" rhymes with "past". But now that people have been saying "a blast from the past" for several decades, it makes sense to say variations like "a blast from the 70s".

    I think the phrase was made popular by radio disc jockeys back in the 1950s and 1960s. Most of the songs they played on the radio were current (that year) hit songs. But sometimes they would play a 10-year-old or 20-year-old hit song, and would introduce it by saying something like:

    And now...a blast from the past...Elvis Presley's "Hound Dog"!

    I've heard that from radio DJs at least a hundred times.
     

    suzi br

    Senior Member
    English / England
    I think the only reason the expression became popular is that "blast" rhymes with "past". But now that people have been saying "a blast from the past" for several decades, it makes sense to say variations like "a blast from the 70s".

    I think the phrase was made popular by radio disc jockeys back in the 1950s and 1960s. Most of the songs they played on the radio were current (that year) hit songs. But sometimes they would play a 10-year-old or 20-year-old hit song, and would introduce it by saying something like:

    And now...a blast from the past...Elvis Presley's "Hound Dog"!

    I've heard that from radio DJs at least a hundred times.
    Yes, I agree this is the main context in which I have heard this used.
    It is interesting to observe that it is spreading and evolving into different contexts.
     
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