a blind guy walks into a bar...

nile84

Senior Member
Persian
Hello

Friends, I don't get the point of this joke:

A blind man walks into a bar... And a chair... and a table.

Could someone explain to me what's funny about it?!

(I found it in the novel My Grandmother Asked Me To Tell You that She's Sorry, by Fredrik Backman)
 
  • Juhasz

    Senior Member
    English - United States
    Are you familiar with other a man walks into a bar jokes?

    This is a very common joke template:
    A mushroom walks into a bar. The bartender says, "We don't serve your kind here." The mushroom says, "Why not, I'm a fun guy (fungi)."
    A sandwich walks into a bar. The bartender says, "Sorry, we don't serve food here."
    A horse walks into a bar. The bartender says, "Why the long face?"

    In all these versions, "walks into a bar" means enters an establishment where alcohol is served. However, "walk into" can also mean collide with, as in I walked into the table and hurt my knee.

    The humor of this joke comes from the reversal of our expectations. We expect "walks into a bar" to mean enters an establishment where alcohol is served, but then we then hear "and a chair and a table," and we have to reanalyze the sentence. Because it is not possible to enter a table or chair, we now know that "walks into" actually meant collides with not enters and bar means "a piece of solid material that is longer than it is wide" (WR dictionary).
     

    nile84

    Senior Member
    Persian
    Are you familiar with other a man walks into a bar jokes?

    This is a very common joke template:
    A mushroom walks into a bar. The bartender says, "We don't serve your kind here." The mushroom says, "Why not, I'm a fun guy (fungi)."
    A sandwich walks into a bar. The bartender says, "Sorry, we don't serve food here."
    A horse walks into a bar. The bartender says, "Why the long face?"

    In all these versions, "walks into a bar" means enters an establishment where alcohol is served. However, "walk into" can also mean collide with, as in I walked into the table and hurt my knee.

    The humor of this joke comes from the reversal of our expectations. We expect "walks into a bar" to mean enters an establishment where alcohol is served, but then we then hear "and a chair and a table," and we have to reanalyze the sentence. Because it is not possible to enter a table or chair, we now know that "walks into" actually meant collides with not enters and bar means "a piece of solid material that is longer than it is wide" (WR dictionary).
    Thanks a lot, Juhasz. Great explanation.:thumbsup:
     
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