a Bloody Mary in my hand

< Previous | Next >

jacdac

Senior Member
Lebanese
Outside his window, which is as small and thick as the window in one of the old Mercury space capsules, he can see a sky which is not blue but the twilight purple of dusk, although it is the middle of the day. At the point where the sea and the sky meet, he can see that the horizon-line is slightly bowed. I am sitting here, Bill thinks, a Bloody Mary in my hand and a dirty fat man’s elbow poking into my bicep, observing the curvature of the earth.

Source: It by Stephen King

In this scene, Bill is in a Concorde on his way from England to Maine.

What does the bolded expression mean?

Thank you.
 
  • RedwoodGrove

    Senior Member
    English, USA
    It's a mixed drink involving tomato juice, vodka, Worcestershire sauce and several other ingredients.
    In this scene, Bill is in a Concorde on his way from England to Maine.
    It can't be from England to Maine in a car and it can't be from New England to Maine because Maine is part of New England, unless I am mistaken.
     

    Juhasz

    Senior Member
    English - United States
    And believe it or not, concordes owned by Air France actually flew to Bangor, Maine. Although, they only did so to refuel. I don't think there was any passenger service to Maine, so one couldn't have flown there from England.
     

    Sparky Malarky

    Moderator
    English - US
    And believe it or not, concordes owned by Air France actually flew to Bangor, Maine. Although, they only did so to refuel. I don't think there was any passenger service to Maine, so one couldn't have flown there from England.
    But one certainly could fly from England to the United States and then travel on to Maine by other means.
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    When flying though Bangor in 1977 from LA to London and the reverse, they let us off the plane and we went through Customs and I believe we switched to a different plane on a different airline. It's hard to believe that Maine residents were actually trapped in the airport and forced to fly on to another destination. I suppose that's possible though.
     

    Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    Outside his window, which is as small and thick as the window in one of the old Mercury space capsules, he can see a sky which is not blue but the twilight purple of dusk, although it is the middle of the day. At the point where the sea and the sky meet, he can see that the horizon-line is slightly bowed. I am sitting here, Bill thinks, a Bloody Mary in my hand and a dirty fat man’s elbow poking into my bicep, observing the curvature of the earth.
    The bolded words mean 'I have a Bloody Mary in my hand ... ', or "I am sitting here with a Bloody Mary in my hand, ... ." or, by implication, "drinking a Bloody Mary". The cocktail called "a 'Bloody Mary' has already been explained in this thread. The OP didn't ask about anything else.

    There's a lot to be said about how to use "Concord", the name of this extremely beautiful, fantastic, supersonic jet.
    There's a lot to be said about this extraordinary aircraft: it regularly flew over my London home. All we heard was the huge supersonic bang. We could often see its iconic silhouette if we took the trouble to look out of the window.

    Flying in a/by Concord cost a lot of money which few people could afford . If somebody said they had flown "on/by Concord", the implication would be that they were rich.

    The writer has chosen to describe this character's thoughts as they were actually happening at that moment in the past.
     
    Last edited:
    < Previous | Next >
    Top