a blue one / one blue one

Julianus

Senior Member
Korean
Hello.


1. Cathy has three bags: a blue one and two red ones. 2. Cathy has three bags: one blue one and two red ones.


I think the second sentence is possible.

Question 1 : If the second is correct, how different is it from the first sentence? (in one white one, is the first 'one' number and the second 'one' noun?)

Question 2 : Do the first 'one' have any other meaning? and is the second sentence common?


Thank you always~.
 
Last edited:
  • Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    Both are possible and both mean the same thing here. "One" might be used to emphasize the point that there is "one" -- but "a" is recognized as "one" in this instance.
     

    natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    Yes, same meaning as Copyright said.

    I would expect (1) in ordinary speech. (2) might be used for emphasis (also mentioned by Copyright); I also associate it with a maths problem sum for this reason. I would say it's not very common, but doesn't sound unusual.
     

    redgiant

    Senior Member
    Cantonese, Hong Kong
    Would you avoid using too many "one"s and use: Cathy has three bags: one blue and the other two red?
     

    natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    If I was trying to be succinct, I would shorten it further: Cathy has three bags, one blue and two red​.
     
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