A Bollywood-turned-politician [somebody <turned> something]

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Lun-14

Banned
Hindi
Hi.

A Person who was first in Bollywood; now he is in the politics.

Can I call this person: A Bollywood-turned-politician.

Thanks a lot.
 
  • pob14

    Senior Member
    American English
    A person can't be a Bollywood, as far as I understand it (Bollywood, in my understanding, is a film genre).

    Retired-teacher's version is what I would say.

    Crossposted with Myridon.
     

    Lun-14

    Banned
    Hindi
    Where do you all get the idea that I say the person himself is a Bollywood?:confused:
    I didn't say that...
     

    pob14

    Senior Member
    American English
    When you say he's an X turned Y, you are saying he used to be an X, but now he's a Y. That's how the expression works. So you did say that. :)
     

    Florentia52

    Modwoman in the attic
    English - United States
    Where do you all get the idea that I say the person himself is a Bollywood?:confused:
    I didn't say that...
    You may be interpreting the phrase incorrectly, then.

    An actor-turned-politiciian is not a politician who has been "actor-turned." whatever that might be. It is an actor who has turned into a politician.

    Thus a Bollywood-turned-politician would have to be a Bollywood that has turned into a politician.
     

    heypresto

    Senior Member
    English - England
    'Politics' (as a singular and without an article) is the art or science of government. It's what politicians 'do'. Students also study 'politics'. The subject, like other subjects, (history, physics, geography etc), doesn't have an article.

    But we say 'the politics' in contexts like 'The politics of the Conservative party' - which means the opinions, beliefs or ideology of the party. Or when talking about the activities and affairs involved in managing a state or a government: "Unemployment dominated the politics of the inter-war years."
     

    Florentia52

    Modwoman in the attic
    English - United States
    Words like "politics" generally don't require the definite article. For example, we don't use "the" with "religion," "economics," or "politics" in these sentences:

    "She was studying religion until she developed an interest in politics."
    "He got involved in politics at a young age, but then become interested in economics."


    There are particular uses that do require the article:

    "He studied the economics of developing countries."
    "She wrote a book on the politics of the 19th=century feminist movement."

    [Cross-posted with heypresto]
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    More a description than a genre.:) It refers to the Hindi film industry in general, which is mainly based in Mumbai, earlier known as Bombay. Bollywood is derived from Hollywood with B for Bombay replacing H.
    Very true. However, many people, at least in the US, associate "Bollywood" with a (genre of) romantic musical with very energetic elaborate song and dance routines with many people. Whether or not they should, is a separate discussion :D The wiki seems quite comprehensive Bollywood - Wikipedia
     
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