A bomb went [off off] our city

< Previous | Next >

ayed

Senior Member
Arabic(Saudi)
hello, folks.


Are the two consecutive elements(a peposition and an adverb)acceptable :

I heard a bomb went off off our city.


Any suggestion or comments?


My regards


Ayed
 
  • entangledbank

    Senior Member
    English - South-East England
    Yes, certainly, though I'd use a different example: A bomb went off off the coast of Brazil. 'Off our city' doesn't quite sound right.
     

    ayed

    Senior Member
    Arabic(Saudi)
    Yes, certainly, though I'd use a different example: A bomb went off off the coast of Brazil. 'Off our city' doesn't quite sound right.
    :eek:You're right. I usually hear "off" is collocated with"coast".I don't know why I forgot that!:confused:I must have been stricken in years:p.

    Many thanks..
     

    pops91710

    Senior Member
    English, AE
    Ayed, just so I am sure, are you saying you heard (that) a bomb went off, or you heard a bomb go off ? As you have it written is correct if you meant the former.
     

    ayed

    Senior Member
    Arabic(Saudi)
    Thanks pops. I meant : I heard that a bomb went off off.I focus on the two consecutive elements"off". and how they are somewhat confusing to me.

    Fabulist, yes, one could avoid that by an alternative.
    Panjandrum this is the gist of my question.I wanted to know how acceptable these are to you.

    Appreciate your comments.


    It is know that such a forgetful person is better be given, like me.
     

    Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    I don't know why anybody would say 'off our city' instead of 'in our city' whether using 'went off' or 'exploded'

    'Off' in the intransitive phrasal verb 'to go off' meaning to explode isn't the same as the preposition 'off' used in an adverbial phrase as in 'She took the money off the table'.

    We can't say They went off the bomb or They went the bomb off or The bomb was went off.

    'To go off' can be used transitively when it means to stop liking something.

    I used to like Mel Gibson but I've gone right off him now.
    My mother used to love that radio show but she went off it after her favourite character died.

    Some people say 'off of' - maybe that habit is causing the confusion. I regard 'off of' as substandard and I rarely if ever hear it in the UK, so I can't comment on whether people would say 'off of' something in the above examples.

    Apart from 'off the coast' ( in the sea) the only possible phrase I can think of starting with off is 'off-target'. I agree that having the two 'offs' together is clumsy and can easily be avoided.

    Hermione
    Afterthought: Is 'off our city' supposed to mean 'outside our city'?
     
    Last edited:
    < Previous | Next >
    Top