A bon vin, il ne faut point de bouchon.

smorodina

Senior Member
UK
Russian
Hello!
Is there an English equivalent of the proverb? Can you please give an example of a situation in which the proverb is used?

Thank you.
 
  • Nico5992

    Senior Member
    France (French)
    On appelle aussi, Bouchon, Le rameau de verdure, ou les autres marques dont on sert pour faire connoistre qu'il y a du vin à vendre en un endroit. Le bon vin n'a que faire de bouchon (BOUCHON) /On dit fig., A bon vin il ne faut point de bouchon pour dire, qu'Une chose qui est bonne n'a pas besoin d'estre affichée ny d'estre annoncée (BON, BOUCHON)
    Source: http://www.chass.utoronto.ca/~wulfric/articles/gehlf598/fig2.htm

    Basically it means that good things don't need publicity.
    I don't know if there's an English equivalent.
     

    valerie

    Senior Member
    France, French & Spanish
    I found this in the dictionnaire de l'académie française 1694:
    On appelle aussi, Bouchon, Le rameau de verdure, ou les autres marques dont on sert pour faire connoistre qu'il y a du vin à vendre en un endroit. Le bon vin n'a que faire de bouchon (BOUCHON) /On dit fig., A bon vin il ne faut point de bouchon pour dire, qu'Une chose qui est bonne n'a pas besoin d'estre affichée ny d'estre annoncée (BON, BOUCHON)

    It seems the word bouchon was used to name the sign of a place where wine was on sale. Then the sentence means that a good wine/thing do not need to be advertised
     

    smorodina

    Senior Member
    UK
    Russian
    That's amazing, Both Nico and Valerie quoted the same source:) Thank you.

    Still struggling with the English version, though.
     

    valerie

    Senior Member
    France, French & Spanish
    claude123 said:
    Here is what they under Proverbs and Maxims at the Federal Translation Bureau (Canada)
    good wine needs no bush
    and do you agree with them?
     

    stevenality

    Member
    Australia English
    I did a few internet searches and found good wine needs no bush as did claude123 as well as good wine needs no publicity.
    I had never heard the first one before although it is apparently a quote from Shakespeare's play As You Like It. Nevertheless, I think the meaning may be a little obscure to most people these days. The second seems unexciting, but I suppose it really is the better alternative. If I were you, I would use good wine needs no publicity.
     

    smorodina

    Senior Member
    UK
    Russian
    Thanks, everyone.

    I was hoping to find some kind of phrase with "on its own merits" in it. Never mind:eek:

    Thank you.
     

    claude123

    Senior Member
    France, French
    It would make sense, because I found an explanation in the Dictionnaire du gai parler, a book that I often found to be trustworthy:
    À bon vin il ne faut point de bouchon: se dit d'une boutique où il y a de bonnes marchandises qui seront vite vendues.
    Le bouchon était une enseigne qu'on plaçait en dehors pour indiquer qu'en cet endroit on vendait du "vin à pot".

    And "Bush" (not that one...) has a similar, archaic meaning : a bunch or branch of ivy formerly hung outside a tavern to indicate wine for sale (Webster).
     

    Benjy

    Senior Member
    English - English
    smorodina said:
    Thanks, everyone.

    I was hoping to find some kind of phrase with "on its own merits" in it. Never mind:eek:

    Thank you.

    something wich sells on its own merits is perfectly appropriate but just not a proverb ;)
     
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