a book can <be come back to>

dual light

Senior Member
KOREAN
Hello,

The following sentence is from a local textbook.
"Also, a book can be put down for a while and come back to later without disrupting the reader’s sense of continuity."

While I understand that "come back to" in this sentence means "can be come back to" in full, could I have your comment on the grammaticality of the passive form "be come back to"?
 
  • owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    The grammar of the sentence from the textbook looks normal to me, dual light. Passive language is often hard to read and understand, but "be put down for a while and come back to later" is understandable and normal in that kind of awkward language. It would be much easier to read and understand in active language: A reader can put a book down and come back to it later without disrupting his sense of continuity.
     

    bennymix

    Senior Member
    The grammar is fine, but the sentence is a bit awkward because of two-word verbs. This version reads better and shows the grammar: A book can be abandoned for a time and returned to later, without a disruption of the reader's sense of continuity.


    Hello,

    The following sentence is from a local textbook.
    "Also, a book can be put down for a while and come back to later without disrupting the reader’s sense of continuity."

    While I understand that "come back to" in this sentence means "can be come back to" in full, could I have your comment on the grammaticality of the passive form "be come back to"?
     
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