a book from divine

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NewAmerica

Banned
Mandarin
The word divine is without a definite article. By writing this way the author refers "divine" to mean "God"?

If it means a clergyman, it would have "a" or "the" before it.


Thanks in advance
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Then, in 2003, she received a book from divine titled Divine Love.

Source (a pic)
 
  • snargleplax

    Senior Member
    English - Northwestern United States
    That appears to be the intended meaning, but it is not a standard usage of the word as far as I'm aware. It seems idiosyncratic.
     

    heypresto

    Senior Member
    English - England
    From the few paragraphs shown in the picture, it appears to be the writer's, and I'm guessing, his or her sect/cult/religion's name for God. I'm surprised, though, to see it's not capitalised.

    Where did you find this? What is the title of the book? Who is the author?
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    From the few paragraphs shown in the picture, it appears to be the writer's, and I'm guessing, his or her sect/cult/religion's name for God. I'm surprised, though, to see it's not capitalised.

    Where did you find this? What is the title of the book? Who is the author?
    It does look like an idiosyncratic use of "divine":)
    Here is the source OP wouldn't present for us About Dr. Rulin Xiu - Soul Healing Miracles
     

    NewAmerica

    Banned
    Mandarin
    From the few paragraphs shown in the picture, it appears to be the writer's, and I'm guessing, his or her sect/cult/religion's name for God. I'm surprised, though, to see it's not capitalised.

    Where did you find this? What is the title of the book? Who is the author?
    From a twitter account. "She" who received a book from divine is this person who is said to be presently invited by China's most renowned university (Tsinghua University) to lecture her divine experience which is beginning to create an uproar nationwide:

     
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