A book with a difference

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*Sarah*

Member
Arabic
Hello everybody,

Would you please explain to me the following sentence?


"It is a book with a difference."

Does it mean: a book with different ideas?



Thank you
 
  • lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    The phrase “with a difference” is often used to describe something that has “a new or unusual feature or treatment” (Oxford definition).

    But out of context, we don’t know what is different about that book. The words only tell us is that it is not a “run-of-the-mill” (standard/ordinary) book; there’s something different about it.
     

    dojibear

    Senior Member
    English - Northeast US
    "It is a book with a difference."
    I can think of at least 2 meanings for this sentence, and there are probably other meanings it could have:

    1. This book is different than other books (in some way). It is special! It is better! Hurrah!

    2. The ideas in this book will "make a difference" in our society: they will benefit our society.
     

    *Sarah*

    Member
    Arabic
    I can think of at least 2 meanings for this sentence, and there are probably other meanings it could have:

    1. This book is different than other books (in some way). It is special! It is better! Hurrah!

    2. The ideas in this book will "make a difference" in our society: they will benefit our society.

    Thank you so much. I guess both of the two explanations fit here because the book is different from other books of the writer who is trying to help people to overcome sadness and be happy and satisfied
     
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