A bottle is 175ml

moyeea

Senior Member
Chinese-China
Hello, teachers.

My friend pointed to a bottle of red wine, and said:

"A bottle is 175ml"

Do we need to say:" The amount of a bottle is 175ml." Because "a bottle " just refers to the wine, right?
 
  • Tegs

    Mód ar líne
    English (Ireland)
    No, what your friend said was fine. It's clear that what he/she means is that the capacity of the bottle is 175ml :)
     

    moyeea

    Senior Member
    Chinese-China
    No, what your friend said was fine. It's clear that what he/she means is that the capacity of the bottle is 175ml :)
    Thanks so much for your help!!!

    But we can also say:

    A bottle can make me drunk.(Here "a bottle" refers to the wine) right?
     

    Tegs

    Mód ar líne
    English (Ireland)
    In that case, I would say: One bottle is enough to make me drunk.

    It's not that your sentence is incorrect - it is fine - but it is not a sentence I would use naturally in such a context.

    And yes, bottle would mean wine, or beer, or any drink (this would be obvious from what type of drink you are holding, pointing to, or talking about).
     

    moyeea

    Senior Member
    Chinese-China
    In that case, I would say: One bottle is enough to make me drunk.

    It's not that your sentence is incorrect - it is fine - but it is not a sentence I would use naturally in such a context.

    And yes, bottle would mean wine, or beer, or any drink (this be obvious from what type of drink you are holding, pointing to, or talking about).
    Thanks so much for your kind help!!!

    A bottle refers to something which is the size of a bottle, right?

    A bottle is 750ml.(750ml also means something which is in 175ml, not just a number)

    But we should say:

    The amount of a bottle of red wine is 750ml.(In this way, we need to put "the amount of", right? But that's why?)

    Thanks a lot!
     

    Tegs

    Mód ar líne
    English (Ireland)
    I would not use "amount of" here. I would say the same as Linkway above - it is a 750ml bottle. Or, if you want to talk about how much wine is in the bottle: there are 750mls of wine in this bottle.
     

    moyeea

    Senior Member
    Chinese-China
    I would not use "amount of" here. I would say the same as Linkway above - it is a 750ml bottle. Or, if you want to talk about how much wine is in the bottle: there are 750mls of wine in this bottle.
    Thanks so much for your kind help!!!!

    But I think " bottle " "two" "Cup", when they are quantifiers, they refer to the things in reality which are in that size, not just numbers, right???

    Like, we can say:

    I want one bottle/cup.

    Or you can point to the things and say:" I want two/some".


    Am I right?
     

    dojibear

    Senior Member
    English - Northeast US
    "A bottle is 175ml"

    Do we need to say:" The amount of a bottle is 175ml." Because "a bottle " just refers to the wine, right?
    This needs to use "in", not "of". The word "bottle" means the container, not the liquid in it.

    The only time "a bottle" means the wine is when "a bottle" is used to mean "a bottleful". That is the amount of wine that one bottle holds, just as "a cupful" is the amount of liquid a cup holds. But this doesn't happen often. Normally "a bottle" means the glass container.

    A bottle refers to something which is the size of a bottle, right?
    No, "a bottle" refers to a bottle.
     

    moyeea

    Senior Member
    Chinese-China
    This needs to use "in", not "of". The word "bottle" means the container, not the liquid in it.

    The only time "a bottle" means the wine is when "a bottle" is used to mean "a bottleful". That is the amount of wine that one bottle holds, just as "a cupful" is the amount of liquid a cup holds. But this doesn't happen often. Normally "a bottle" means the glass container.



    No, "a bottle" refers to a bottle.
    Thanks so much for your help!!!

    But when "a bottle" refers to " bottleful", can the bottle refers to the wine which is that much?

    In other words, why can we say:

    I want to drink the whole bottle.(drink the wine)

    Please enjoy every bite in your mouth.(enjoy the food)

    This kind of drug is very dangerous. One shot can kill a person.(One shot refers to the drug, not just number, right?)

    I don't want too much. Just give me 2 kilograms. (happened in a meat shop, 2kg refers to the meat, not just a number, right?)


    I really appreciate your kind help!
     

    dojibear

    Senior Member
    English - Northeast US
    "I want to drink the whole bottle." is the same as "I want to drink all the wine in the bottle". The word "bottle" still means the container.

    It is hard for me to think of a sentence where "bottle" clearly means the wine and not the container.

    I did not understand how your other sentences (bite, drug, meat) relate to what we are talking about.
     

    moyeea

    Senior Member
    Chinese-China
    "I want to drink the whole bottle." is the same as "I want to drink all the wine in the bottle". The word "bottle" still means the container.

    It is hard for me to think of a sentence where "bottle" clearly means the wine and not the container.

    I did not understand how your other sentences (bite, drug, meat) relate to what we are talking about.
    Thanks so much!!!

    Some books put these words together, call them "quantifiers".

    A bite, a group, a bottle.

    But I think the meaning is different.

    Like: There is no bottle. Normally, 750 ml is a bottle. I drank 750ml of wine from the barrel. I can still say :"I drank a bottle"(You can't drink container, right?)

    And we still can say: I want some/one/six. These words still means the things wihch have same amount, right?
     

    Tegs

    Mód ar líne
    English (Ireland)
    Normally, 750 ml is a bottle. I drank 750ml of wine from the barrel. I can still say :"I drank a bottle"(You can't drink container, right?)
    No, in this case you wouldn't say I drank a bottle, because the wine you drank came from a barrel, not a bottle. You would have to say I drank 750ml of wine. Or you could say I drank the equivalent of a bottle of wine.
     

    moyeea

    Senior Member
    Chinese-China
    No, in this case you wouldn't say I drank a bottle, becuase the wine you drank came from a barrel, not a bottle. You would have to say I drank 750ml of wine. Or you could say I drank the equivalent of a bottle of wine.
    Thanks so much for your help!!!
    But if I say: I want two meters.
    can I say: I want 200 centimeters?

    Here is the context: My boss let me some bags of books into drawers. I put two bags of books into two drawers.
    Each of the two drawers has one bag of books. Now my boss is back and he wants to check,
    Can I point to one drawer and say:

    Here is one bag of books./Here is one bag.(Because he already know what kind of things it is.)

    Thanks a lot!!!
     

    Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    Yes, we can normally refer to the container without naming what is in it, when people already know what is in it, just as we can refer to a weight or measurement when people already know what is being weighed or measured.

    That is a generally true, but may not work in a particular example. If you have questions about a sentence different from the ones already discussed, please start a new thread to ask about it. We ask that each thread focus on a particular part of a single sentence. It is too confusing to talk about different sentences in a single thread.
     

    moyeea

    Senior Member
    Chinese-China
    Yes, we can normally refer to the container without naming what is in it, when people already know what is in it, just as we can refer to a weight or measurement when people already know what is being weighed or measured.

    That is a generally true, but may not work in a particular example. If you have questions about a sentence different from the ones already discussed, please start a new thread to ask about it. We ask that each thread focus on a particular part of a single sentence. It is too confusing to talk about different sentences in a single thread.
    Thanks Cagey, let me stop here!

    But just one more sentence.

    I want two bottles.(If I say this one, "two bottles" means the wine, not container, right?)
     

    Tegs

    Mód ar líne
    English (Ireland)
    It means both the containers and the wine - you would not be buying the containers without the wine, but you also would not be buying the wine without the containers. You buy both together.
     

    moyeea

    Senior Member
    Chinese-China
    It means both the containers and the wine - you would not be buying the containers without the wine, but you also would not be buying the wine without the containers. You buy both together.
    Thanks so much for your help!!!!

    But in the collins dictionry.

    The second meaning: You can use bottle to refer to a bottle and its contents, or to the contents only.

    In the wine industry, a bottle is 750 ml.

    So I think, like changing unit.

    If the man who works in wine industry and he prefers buying wine without bottling, he went to buy some wine from producers and said this.

    It could be understand, because the wine producer already knew what his habit is...
     

    Tegs

    Mód ar líne
    English (Ireland)
    You can use bottle to refer to a bottle and its contents, or to the contents only.
    Of course, when you say 'I drank a bottle of wine' this does not mean that you also drank the container. But when you buy a bottle of wine you buy both the container and the wine.
     

    moyeea

    Senior Member
    Chinese-China
    Of course, when you say 'I drank a bottle of wine' this does not mean that you also drank the container. But when you buy a bottle of wine you buy both the container and the wine.
    Yes,Normally it is.

    But just suppose I'm a wine producer. I forgot to bring bottles,but I have a big vat. And in this way, I can say:

    I want three bottles,that means 2250ml.

    Am I right?
     

    RedwoodGrove

    Senior Member
    English, USA
    Hi moyeea,

    The huge, vast majority of wine is sold in 750 ml bottles. So when people say a "bottle of wine" that's what they mean. The Collins dictionary is slightly misleading because in English (and other languages) any container can refer to the contents. This is called synecdoche. It is not unusual or remarkable. The point is to know that when you walk into a shop, you're going to find a large aisle of wine bottles that are mostly 750 ml with some 150 ml bottles. On the other hand, hard alcohol such as vodka or whiskey, is sold in 750 or 175 ml bottles, and various others (in this country).

    A bottle can be any size.

    In my experience, there are different levels of measurement. There is the common measurement that people use for buying at a shop, there is the commercial measurement that business people use for communicating with each other, and there is scientific measurement. To confuse these matters, there is also the measurements that people use in everyday speech outside of commercial interactions. The problem is to differentiate between these.
     
    Last edited:

    moyeea

    Senior Member
    Chinese-China
    Hi moyeea,

    The huge, vast majority of wine is sold in 750 ml bottles. So when people say a "bottle of wine" that's what they mean. The Collins dictionary is slightly misleading because in English (and other languages) any container can refer to the contents. This is called synecdoche. It is not unusual or remarkable. The point is to know that when you walk into a shop, you're going to find a large aisle of wine bottles that are mostly 750 ml with some 150 ml bottles. On the other hand, hard alcohol such as vodka or whiskey, is sold in 750 or 175 ml bottle (in this country).

    A bottle can be any size.
    Thanks so much for your kind help, sir!!!

    My books call them quantifiers.(bottle, bite, plate, cup, one , two, three, some, few)

    I think these words refer to the things in reality which are in that size descrbed by the words, right?(not just numbers)

    And for wine, I agree normally we buy a bottle of wine with the bottles.

    WHat if the producer already knows it is 750 ml a bottle, and now I am also a producer, I want to buy some wine from another producer, and bottle them with my tag.

    In this way, can I say:"I want 10 bottles (1750ml), just give me the wine in barrel, I can bottle them by myslef".

    Does this one make sense?
     

    RedwoodGrove

    Senior Member
    English, USA
    In this way, can I say:"I want 10 bottles (1750ml), just give me the wine in barrel, I can bottle them by myslef".
    I was amending my post when you responded with this, so that partly addresses your question. Commercial trade (business) has its own language and terminology. In general, for the non-professional, you'd probably say "I want 10 bottles-worth of ..." That would indicate quantity.

    But 10 bottles-worth would probably be 7,500 ml.
     

    moyeea

    Senior Member
    Chinese-China
    I was amending my post when you responded with this, so that partly addresses your question. Commercial trade (business) has its own language and terminology. In general, for the non-professional, you'd probably say "I want 10 bottles-worth of ..." That would indicate quantity.

    But 10 bottles-worth would probably be 7,500 ml.
    Thanks so much for your kind help!

    That means it is not about grammar, “bottles“here still means the wine, not just a number or container,right?

    It is about if it is acceptable in daily life,right sir?
     

    RedwoodGrove

    Senior Member
    English, USA
    “bottles“here still means the wine, not just a number or container,right?
    If I understand you correctly, that is right. The size of the bottle is determined by what's in it, in a manner of speaking. It has to do with what people are accustomed to dealing with. If 99% of the wine you see is in 750 ml bottles, then a bottle of wine is 750 ml. As you point out:
    It is about if it is acceptable in daily life,right sir?
    Right. The same holds true for vinegar or soy sauce.

    So it is not about grammar. It is about usage.
     

    moyeea

    Senior Member
    Chinese-China
    If I understand you correctly, that is right. The size of the bottle is determined by what's in it, in a manner of speaking. It has to do with what people are accustomed to dealing with. If 99% of the wine you see is in 750 ml bottles, then a bottle of wine is 750 ml. As you point out:

    Right. The same holds true for vinegar or soy sauce.

    So it is not about grammar. It is about usage.
    Thanks so much for your kind help!!!
     
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