A bottle is lying down/rests downwards?

shop-englishx

Banned
Urdu
Hello, my friends,

I want to describe this picture:


Can I say: A bottle is lying down and oil is tripping out of it. / A bottle rests downwards and oil is tripping out of it.

Thank you very much
 
  • BLUEGLAZE

    Senior Member
    English - USA
    Here is one way - A bottle lies flat on the floor with its contents spilling out.
    We do not use 'to lie down' with inanimate objects'.
    Words may come tripping off your tongue but that is not the correct verb for spillage.
    Perhaps for 'tripping' you meant 'dripping' but that would be coming out of the bottle drop by drop.
     

    MilkyBarKid

    Senior Member
    British English
    A bottle is lying flat and a green liquid is trickling out. ( We do not know it's 'oil'. It could be creme de menthe, or cough medicine.)
     

    shop-englishx

    Banned
    Urdu
    Thank you very much.:) What about:

    A bottle is resting/rests flat ...
    A bottle is staying flat ...

    I am wondering why I cannot use "down" with "lie/rest" with these objects.
     

    BLUEGLAZE

    Senior Member
    English - USA
    The action of 'down', with to lie, must be made by a person or an animal. One would never find it used with the verb rest unless it was a preposition.
    I rested down by the river. To lie down is an act of will.

    A bottle is resting flat on the floor is possible but not really colloquial.
    'Stay' in this sentence, as you are using it, would also be an act of will and the bottle cannot do that.
     

    shop-englishx

    Banned
    Urdu
    Thanks for your helpful answer, GWB.:) Should I describe the picture by simple present tense or present continuous tense, e.g.,
    The bottle is lying . . . /The bottle lies . . . ? I think both are correct ways.

    Would you use "tripping" in the second part of the sentence? If not, why wouldn't you use it?
     

    GreenWhiteBlue

    Senior Member
    USA - English
    Thanks for your helpful answer, GWB.:) Should I describe the picture by simple present tense or present continuous tense, e.g.,
    The bottle is lying . . . /The bottle lies . . . ? I think both are correct ways.
    Correct and natural are not the same thing in English. While both are correct, the present continuous is more natural as a description of the picture.

    Would you use "tripping" in the second part of the sentence?
    No, of course not.

    If not, why wouldn't you use it?
    Because nothing is "tripping" from the bottle. On the other hand, I might use dripping, which is a very, very different word!!
     
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