a box of chocolate

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keeley_h

Senior Member
Bulgarian
Hi everybody,

Which does the noun that means a container ---'box' or 'bucket' --- in the following phrases mean, the real/genuine container or the amount that the real/genuine container usually admits or holds?

a box of chocolate
a bucket of water
 
  • Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    Would you please give us sentences for context?

    These will mean different things depending on what is being discussed, and why they are mentioned.

    (And context is a requirement of the forum. ;) )
     

    keeley_h

    Senior Member
    Bulgarian
    Oh, sorry.
    The context is as follows.

    1. Liz bought something at a grocery store. Liz says to the cashier, "A box of chocolate and two colas."

    2. Liz's mother Pat bought Liz chocolate. Liz says to herself, "Wow! How big! I can't eat a box of chocolate at a time."

    3. Chris and his son Jim are washing their car. Chris thought he needed some water and a bucket. He says to Jim, "Go fetch a bucket of water."

    4. There was a big earthquake and suspension of water supply happend. Chris and his son Jim are measuring water to deliver to the people of their group. Chris says to Jim, "Water is short. We need one more bucket of water."
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    (1) box of chocolates = box plus chocolates.
    (2) box of chocolates = only the contents of the box.
    (3) bucket of water = bucket plus water.
    (4) If they are filling another container using the bucket, then bucket of water = only the contents of the bucket. If they are lining up lots of buckets to take away, then bucket of water = bucket plus water.
     

    keeley_h

    Senior Member
    Bulgarian
    Oh, it's so nice!
    I undestand.
    I have no questions and no problems about the meaning of the phrases now.

    But my original question is just a bit different.
    My original quetion is:
    Which does the noun that means a container ---'box' or 'bucket' --- in the following phrases mean, the real/genuine container or the amount that the real/genuine container usually admits or holds?

    But I think my original question is difficult to understand. So let me explain my question again.

    I think box or bucket can have two meanings, meaning 1 and meaning 2.
    meaning 1: a real/genuine box or bucket.
    meaning 2: the amount that a real/genuine box or a real/genuine bucket usually admits or holds.

    Does 'box' or 'bucket' in context 1 and 3 mean meaning 1?
    Does 'box' in context 2 mean meaning 2?
    Does 'bucket' in context 4 mean either meaning 1 or meaning 2 depending on the situation?
     
    Last edited:

    entangledbank

    Senior Member
    English - South-East England
    I suppose you're asking about these in comparison to things like 'a cup of water', where it often means a specific quantity (200 mL or 300 mL or whatever it is), rather than any size of cup full of water? I don't think we'd use either of your examples like this: a swimming pool holds 2000 buckets of water? No, unlikely. And definitely not a box of chocolates - that's a real box with the chocolates that come in it, not a particular amount (20 to 25, say) of chocolates.
     

    JamesM

    Senior Member
    In the U.S. a pre-packaged box of chocolates is usually sold by weight. It can be anywhere from four small chocolates in a box weighing about two ounces up to two pounds or more of individual chocolates in a large box.

    Here is a picture of a small box of chocolates (heart-shaped for Valentine's Day):

    http://qd.sees.com/prodimg/1209_638tradhrt4ozbigQ.jpg

    Here is a picture of a large box of chocolates:

    http://janeheller.mlblogs.com/chocolate_heart.jpg

    A box of chocolates doesn't really tell us how many chocolates or how much the box weighs.

    1. Liz bought something at a grocery store. Liz says to the cashier, "A box of chocolates and two colas."

    This is both the box and the chocolates inside the box.

    2. Liz's mother Pat bought Liz chocolate. Liz says to herself, "Wow! How big! I can't eat a box of chocolates at a time."

    This is the quantity of chocolates that a box of chocolates would hold. She will not eat the box itself. It could also be said, "I can't eat a box worth of chocolates at a time" or "I can't eat a boxful of chocolates at a time."

    3. Chris and his son Jim are washing their car. Chris thought he needed some water and a bucket. He says to Jim, "Go fetch a bucket of water."

    This means the bucket and the water in it.


    4. There was a big earthquake and suspension of water supply happend. Chris and his son Jim are measuring water to deliver to the people of their group. Chris says to Jim, "Water is short. We need one more bucket of water."

    This means the quantity of water that one bucket would hold. It could also be said, "We need one more bucketful of water."
     
    Last edited:

    keeley_h

    Senior Member
    Bulgarian
    It took a little time to understand. It was a high mountain for me.
    But I understand.
    It's so clear and I have no questions now!

    Thanks!
    Ciao.
     
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