a box of sweets

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raymondaliasapollyon

Senior Member
Chinese
Hi,

I'd like to know what "sweets" means as in "a box of sweets", particularly
in American English. Does it necessarily mean "candy"?

I'd appreciate your help.
 
  • Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    In American English, "sweets" are practically any sort of sweet food. Since we don't mean just candy, we don't say "a box of sweets."
    I'm on a diet, so I'm not eating sweets. (Cake, pie, cookies, candy, doughnuts, pastries, ...)
     

    Keith Bradford

    Senior Member
    English (Midlands UK)
    In British English, a box of sweets might contain any kind of confectionery; for example chocolates, hard boiled sweets, liquorice, jellies, or candy (a softer boiled-sugar confection). Nowadays, it might even contain large boiled-milk confections from India or Pakistan. It does not contain cake, pie, biscuits, doughnuts, pastries...
     

    raymondaliasapollyon

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    In American English, "sweets" are practically any sort of sweet food. Since we don't mean just candy, we don't say "a box of sweets."
    I'm on a diet, so I'm not eating sweets. (Cake, pie, cookies, candy, doughnuts, pastries, ...)
    So a box of sweets could refer to a box of cookies, for example?
    I am thinking about whether the container designation 'box' can influence how you interpret 'sweets'.
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    Are you suggesting cakes, cookies, and candies are not found in the same box? Is that why you don't say 'a box of sweets'?
    In American English, the category of "sweets" (anything that is eaten or drunk because it is sugary) is so broad that it includes things that are entirely dissimilar. A box with two scoops of ice cream and then filled with Coca-cola. ;):eek:;)
    It's generally only a category word. It would be rare (though perhaps it is used in some regions or dialects) to refer to a slice of cake as "a sweet" whereas in BrE (I believe) it's possible refer to a piece of candy as "a sweet."
     

    raymondaliasapollyon

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    In American English, the category of "sweets" (anything that is eaten or drunk because it is sugary) is so broad that it includes things that are entirely dissimilar. A box with two scoops of ice cream and then filled with Coca-cola. ;):eek:;)
    It's generally only a category word. It would be rare (though perhaps it is used in some regions or dialects) to refer to a slice of cake as "a sweet" whereas in BrE (I believe) it's possible refer to a piece of candy as "a sweet."
    In Taiwan, it is common for guests at a wedding reception to receive a box of sweet foods containing candies and cookies individually packaged in packets. Would you refer to it as "a box of sweets"?
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    From the Collins (BE) entry - two noted as "brit" i.e. used in BE not AE. Two distinct meanings
    •(often plural) brit any of numerous kinds of confectionery consisting wholly or partly of sugar, esp of sugar boiled and crystallized (boiled sweets)
    •brit a pudding, fruit, or any sweet dish served as a dessert*
    The second one would not come as several in a box, so "box of sweets" refers to the first entry.
    By the same token, "box of sweets" would not mean much in AE other than a box containing some sweet things:)

    *possibly derived from the French suite - as it follows the main course.
     

    raymondaliasapollyon

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    From the Collins (BE) entry - two noted as "brit" i.e. used in BE not AE. Two distinct meanings

    The second one would not come as several in a box, so "box of sweets" refers to the first entry.
    By the same token, "box of sweets" would not mean much in AE other than a box containing some sweet things:)

    *possibly derived from the French suite - as it follows the main course.
    Sweet - Definition for English-Language Learners from Merriam-Webster's Learner's Dictionary


    The Merriam-Webster Dictionary defines 'sweets' as follows:

    1
    a [count] : a food that contains a lot of sugar : a sweet food
    I'm trying to cut down on sweets.

    b [count] British : a piece of candy
    a bag of sweets

    c [count, noncount] British : a sweet food served at the end of a meal : dessert

    Since sense 1a is not specifically designated as British, I am wondering why you wouldn't say 'a box of sweets' in American English to refer to, for example, a box of candies and cookies. Note it is not the dessert sense you brought up.
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    Since sense 1a is not specifically designated as British, I am wondering why you wouldn't say 'a box of sweets' in American English to refer to, for example, a box of candies and cookies. Note it is not the dessert sense you brought up.
    You could, but that situation would be more likely to use a different word - donuts, desserts, cakes, cookies, cupcakes etc
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US

    raymondaliasapollyon

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    I think I'm beginning to have an idea of how the word 'sweets' works in general American English.
    It's a category word, much like mankind, so 'a box of sweets' does not make any more sense than, say, a group of mankind.
    'A box of sweets' is understood as a box of candy by Americans, presumably because people have heard it from Brits a lot,
    not because the word 'sweets' as used in general American English makes this reading available.

    I'd welcome your feedback.
     

    raymondaliasapollyon

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    That said, I've found that the word 'sweets' can be used to refer to other kinds of sweet food than candy or chocolates in British sources.

    Consider the news caption from Reuters:

    Eating in India: sweets | Pictures | Reuters

    Boys who practice wrestling hold up a box of sweets in Chandigarh August 12, 2012. REUTERS/Ajay Verma/Files

    So, I'm interested in whether the above represents how the Brits generally understand the word 'sweets'. Or is it South Asian English (a possibility that I don't place much faith in, as Reuters is such a prestigious British media group that any piece of news is supposed to be edited before being published)?
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    Nope - that looks like Indian English, which is quite often different from other kinds of English. (That link is to the India Edition of Reurters.) BE would not refer to the things in that box as "sweets". Here is a link to a UK site advertising a "box of sweets".
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    Me too, when talking about "Greek sweets" like baklavas. I think that these kinds of things used to be called "sweetmeats", but unfortunately that word is much too antique to be used today.

    (Edit: "kinds".)
     
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    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    Sorry, Julian, but that's exactly what we do call them, though we specify the origin. For me (and I've eaten many a boxful from takeaways in Rusholme, Manchester) that's "a box of Indian/Pakistani sweets".

    See The Best 10 Sweet Shops near Rusholme, Manchester
    OK - that's different, when the context or you specify "Pakistani sweets" or "Greek sweets" etc. You could also technically call a box with half a dozen mini-apple crumbles a "box of sweets":)
    (sweet BRIT a pudding, fruit, or any sweet dish served as a dessert)

    (The link takes me to shops that are in the Yelp category "candy stores, desserts, Indian". Perhaps, with increased immigrant integration, the general UK population has indeed changed its usage of "sweets" and I've been left behind:eek: )
     
    Last edited:

    raymondaliasapollyon

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    OK - that's different, when the context or you specify "Pakistani sweets" or "Greek sweets" etc. You could also technically call a box with half a dozen mini-apple crumbles a "box of sweets":)
    (sweet BRIT a pudding, fruit, or any sweet dish served as a dessert)

    (The link takes me to shops that are in the Yelp category "candy stores, desserts, Indian". Perhaps, with increased immigrant integration, the general UK population has indeed changed its usage of "sweets" and I've been left behind:eek: )
    I've found the following in the corpus of contemporary American English (COCA):

    At the age of 21, I worked in corporate sales at Tech Electronics in St. Louis, selling phone systems. Then I moonlighted for a while and started with family recipes, testing them out on my clients and neighbors. We started doing mainly corporate gifts. The cookies and other sweets that we made were arranged in corporate gift boxes.


    Pearland residents may be surprised to know that they have such a good coffee house in their midst...There's generally a good selection of pastries and other sweets. And if there isn't, then shame on you for not getting there quicker.


    Mark Ballard grew up in a household where the favorite pastime was congregating in the kitchen to eat cakes, cookies, and other sweets.

    Are these only examples of a category label?

    BBC - Food - Collections : Homemade sweets

    The BBC seems to regard macaroons and lemon and thyme cookies are 'sweets'.
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    I've found the following in the corpus of contemporary American English (COCA):

    At the age of 21, I worked in corporate sales at Tech Electronics in St. Louis, selling phone systems. Then I moonlighted for a while and started with family recipes, testing them out on my clients and neighbors. We started doing mainly corporate gifts. The cookies and other sweets that we made were arranged in corporate gift boxes.


    Pearland residents may be surprised to know that they have such a good coffee house in their midst...There's generally a good selection of pastries and other sweets. And if there isn't, then shame on you for not getting there quicker.


    Mark Ballard grew up in a household where the favorite pastime was congregating in the kitchen to eat cakes, cookies, and other sweets.

    Are these only examples of a category label?

    BBC - Food - Collections : Homemade sweets

    The BBC seems to regard macaroons and lemon and thyme cookies are 'sweets'.
    Posts 2,5,6,10,15 and 17 have given pretty good feedback on the original question of how an AE speaker would understand "box of sweets".
    From Keith's description for BE, I have learnt about the recent addition to the definition of the items from India or Pakistan but he does not use the term "box of sweets" for a box containing "sweet dishes served as dessert."
    In British English, a box of sweets might contain any kind of confectionery; for example chocolates, hard boiled sweets, liquorice, jellies, or candy (a softer boiled-sugar confection). Nowadays, it might even contain large boiled-milk confections from India or Pakistan. It does not contain cake, pie, biscuits, doughnuts, pastries...
    You have found some examples both of a different definition (sweet BRIT *a pudding, fruit, or any sweet dish served as a dessert) and examples of things that Americans refer to as candies. The word sweet is versatile and differs in different locations/neighbourhoods. Many of the "sweets" in the picture in your BBC link are not "sweet dishes served as dessert", but things an AE speaker would expect to find in a candy store, not on a dessert menu. A BE speaker would put them in the confectionery category (it includes fudge, caramels etc). On that site are also items that could fall into the "sweet dish served as dessert" category.
    Perhaps you can re-state your question if it remains unanswered")

    * Kate Fox (in "Watching the English") has some interesting comments on this particular use of the word "sweet" to mean dessert - it is not used uniformly throughout BE society!
    The upper-middle and upper classes insist that the sweet course at the end of a meal is called the ‘pudding’ – never the ‘sweet’, or ‘afters’, or ‘dessert’, all of which are déclassé, unacceptable words. ‘Sweet’ can be used freely as an adjective, but as a noun it is piece of confectionery – what the Americans call ‘candy’ – and nothing else. The course at the end of the meal is always ‘pudding’, whatever it consists of: a slice of cake is ‘pudding’, so is a lemon sorbet. Asking: ‘Does anyone want a sweet?’ at the end of a meal will get you immediately classified as middle-middle or below.
     

    raymondaliasapollyon

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    Posts 2,5,6,10,15 and 17 have given pretty good feedback on the original question of how an AE speaker would understand "box of sweets".
    From Keith's description for BE, I have learnt about the recent addition to the definition of the items from India or Pakistan but he does not use the term "box of sweets" for a box containing "sweet dishes served as dessert."


    You have found some examples both of a different definition (sweet BRIT *a pudding, fruit, or any sweet dish served as a dessert) and examples of things that Americans refer to as candies. The word sweet is versatile and differs in different locations/neighbourhoods. Many of the "sweets" in the picture in your BBC link are not "sweet dishes served as dessert", but things an AE speaker would expect to find in a candy store, not on a dessert menu. A BE speaker would put them in the confectionery category (it includes fudge, caramels etc). On that site are also items that could fall into the "sweet dish served as dessert" category.
    Perhaps you can re-state your question if it remains unanswered")

    * Kate Fox (in "Watching the English") has some interesting comments on this particular use of the word "sweet" to mean dessert - it is not used uniformly throughout BE society!

    Since you said 'sweets' in American English is a category label, I'm asking whether the examples from the COCA represent use of a category label. (And how do we distinguish a category label from a non-category label, by the way?)

    And I'm not talking about the dessert sense of the word; the AHD gives the following senses of the word, not all of which
    have to do with desserts. The COCA examples do not all have to do with desserts either.

    n.
    1. Sweet taste or quality; sweetness.
    2. Something sweet to the taste.
    3. sweets
    a.
    Foods, such as candy, pastries, puddings, or preserves, that are high in sugar content.
    b. Informal Sweet potatoes:candied sweets.
    4. Chiefly British
    a. A sweet dish, such as pudding, served as dessert.
    b. A sweetmeat or confection.
    5. A dear or beloved person.
    6. Something pleasing to the mind or feelings.
     

    Keith Bradford

    Senior Member
    English (Midlands UK)
    I hadn't addressed the sweet = dessert issue, because it's never used in the context of a box. You don't put flambeed Christmas pudding with brandy butter in a box - it would set it on fire! You don't serve prunes and custard in a box - they'd seep through! In Britain, the only sweets you'd put in a box are the ones we've identified above: chocolates, toffees, fruit jellies, humbugs, etc, and occasionally the smaller, dry Indian or Greek confectioneries.

    Now, if you're talking about the last course but one of a traditional British meal - after the main course but before the cheese - that's a whole different topic. It's called pudding in posh homes, dessert in restaurants and sweet or afters in not-so-posh homes. Served usually on a plate or in a dish. No boxes in sight.
     

    raymondaliasapollyon

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    I hadn't addressed the sweet = dessert issue, because it's never used in the context of a box. You don't put flambeed Christmas pudding with brandy butter in a box - it would set it on fire! You don't serve prunes and custard in a box - they'd seep through! In Britain, the only sweets you'd put in a box are the ones we've identified above: chocolates, toffees, fruit jellies, humbugs, etc, and occasionally the smaller, dry Indian or Greek confectioneries.

    Now, if you're talking about the last course but one of a traditional British meal - after the main course but before the cheese - that's a whole different topic. It's called pudding in posh homes, dessert in restaurants and sweet or afters in not-so-posh homes. Served usually on a plate or in a dish. No boxes in sight.

    I am not interested in the dessert sense. It's irrelevant to what I want to talk about.
    Anyway, thanks to advances in the food packaging industry, many food items such as cakes, preserves, and cookies can be individually packaged and be placed in a box. Would that qualify as 'a box of sweets' for you?
     

    raymondaliasapollyon

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    I've just found the following example.

    Some of those earliest memories show up in a trio of sweets -- - chocolate-covered peppermint patties, peanut butter cookies topped with dark chocolate kisses and cinnamon caramels -- - perfect for giving in a holiday gift tin.

    Note that this is also from the COCA. Obviously, a trio of sweets can include cookies, why can't a box of sweets include cookies (especially when they are individually packaged)?
     

    heypresto

    Senior Member
    English - England
    As Keith Bradford has painstakingly pointed out "In British English, a box of sweets might contain any kind of confectionery; for example chocolates, hard boiled sweets, liquorice, jellies, or candy (a softer boiled-sugar confection). Nowadays, it might even contain large boiled-milk confections from India or Pakistan. It does not contain cake, pie, biscuits, doughnuts, pastries..." and "In Britain, the only sweets you'd put in a box are the ones we've identified above: chocolates, toffees, fruit jellies, humbugs, etc, and occasionally the smaller, dry Indian or Greek confectioneries."

    A box of sweets would not include cookies, even if they were individually wrapped.
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    I am not interested in the dessert sense. It's irrelevant to what I want to talk about.
    Anyway, thanks to advances in the food packaging industry, many food items such as cakes, preserves, and cookies can be individually packaged and be placed in a box. Would that qualify as 'a box of sweets' for you?
    I think the BE speakers are pretty clear on this - about as clear as the AE speakers:) Yes, the phrase "box of sweets" appears in both AE and BE. In BE it has a clear meaning (no desserts, cakes, puddings or cookies involved) while AE speakers would have to guess the contents, because the phrase is not at all common. So you can use the phrase to describe whatever you like, but don't expect AE speakers to know what you mean without further details, and BE speakers already know what they mean by the phrase.
     

    raymondaliasapollyon

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    As Keith Bradford has painstakingly pointed out "In British English, a box of sweets might contain any kind of confectionery; for example chocolates, hard boiled sweets, liquorice, jellies, or candy (a softer boiled-sugar confection). Nowadays, it might even contain large boiled-milk confections from India or Pakistan. It does not contain cake, pie, biscuits, doughnuts, pastries..." and "In Britain, the only sweets you'd put in a box are the ones we've identified above: chocolates, toffees, fruit jellies, humbugs, etc, and occasionally the smaller, dry Indian or Greek confectioneries."

    A box of sweets would not include cookies, even if they were individually wrapped.
    But have you looked at his rationale, which was put forward after the above passage you've quoted?

    His rationale is this:...You don't put flambeed Christmas pudding with brandy butter in a box - it would set it on fire! You don't serve prunes and custard in a box - they'd seep through!

    Obviously, he was pointing out a container issue. Now that the issue can be resolved due to today's technology or does not arise in the case of certain sweet foods like cookies, why can't a box of sweets contain cookies? Any principled reason?

    I'm just eager to find out reasonable answers. Please bear with me.
     

    raymondaliasapollyon

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    I think the BE speakers are pretty clear on this - about as clear as the AE speakers:) Yes, the phrase "box of sweets" appears in both AE and BE. In BE it has a clear meaning (no desserts, cakes, puddings or cookies involved) while AE speakers would have to guess the contents, because the phrase is not at all common. So you can use the phrase to describe whatever you like, but don't expect AE speakers to know what you mean without further details, and BE speakers already know what they mean by the phrase.
    Thank you. That's useful!
    Still, I'm still on the lookout for a principled reason, especially after I found the BBC's Homemade Sweets section includes
    lemon cookies.
     

    LVRBC

    Senior Member
    English-US, standard and medical
    The reasonable answers are all used up - language is what it is and people from both sides of the pond have done their best to explain the different meanings or, in the case of AmE, non-meaning. You can make up exceptions and personal meanings, but they will not be useful in communicating with English speakers.
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    The BBC site you linked to is part of their "Halloween Collection" and asks: "Looking for something sweet to give to a special someone? You've come to the right place..." They have collected a bunch of recipes for sweet things - note they did not use "Looking for some sweets to give to a special someone? You've come to the right place..."

    One of the cookie recipes also makes the same distinction (using "sweet treat" not "sweet".) "These cookies keep well in the fridge in an airtight container. They can also be frozen individually and heated from frozen when you fancy a sweet treat.

    The support for using a "box of sweets" to refer to cakes, doughnuts and cookies seems pretty thin on the ground, but do let us know if you find a principled reason for such a very rare usage in either AE or BE :)
     

    raymondaliasapollyon

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    The BBC site you linked to is part of their "Halloween Collection" and asks: "Looking for something sweet to give to a special someone? You've come to the right place..." They have collected a bunch of recipes for sweet things - note they did not use "Looking for some sweets to give to a special someone? You've come to the right place..."

    One of the cookie recipes also makes the same distinction (using "sweet treat" not "sweet".) "These cookies keep well in the fridge in an airtight container. They can also be frozen individually and heated from frozen when you fancy a sweet treat.

    The support for using a "box of sweets" to refer to cakes, doughnuts and cookies seems pretty thin on the ground, but do let us know if you find a principled reason for such a very rare usage in either AE or BE :)
    "Sweets" are necessarily something sweet. "Looking for something sweet to give to a special someone? " doesn't say much about whether 'cookies' are considered sweets, or why a box of sweets shouldn't contain cookies. After all, the title is Homemade sweets.



     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    "Sweets" are necessarily something sweet. "Looking for something sweet to give to a special someone? " doesn't say much about whether 'cookies' are considered sweets, or why a box of sweets shouldn't contain cookies. After all, the title is Homemade sweets.
    Are you still trying to argue that "a box of sweets" could/should be interpreted as a "box of cakes and cookies" by a BE speaker or an AE speaker??? Or are you asking why it is not?

    These are sweets in a sweet shop
     

    raymondaliasapollyon

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    Are you still trying to argue that "a box of sweets" could/should be interpreted as a "box of cakes and cookies" by a BE speaker or an AE speaker??? Or are you asking why it is not?
    I'm saying the line you've quoted says little about the discussion. It doesn't get us anywhere.

    Btw, do you consider those examples I found in the COCA natural AmE?
     

    raymondaliasapollyon

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    So you are arguing for it?
    No, I'm trying to find a principled account.
    The photo of a sweets shop is interesting; are you saying that a sweets shop never sells cookies or cakes?
    What about a confectionery store? Are sweet confections never called sweets in BrE?

    We still have the fact that the BBC has the section titled Homemade Sweets to explain away.
     

    heypresto

    Senior Member
    English - England
    The photo of a sweets shop is interesting; are you saying that a sweets shop never sells cookies or cakes?
    Yes. Well, I haven't visited every sweet shop in the country, so it's possible, I suppose, that the odd shop somewhere might sell the odd cookie. But it wouldn't be thought of as a sweet. I do know, however, that some sweet shops also sell ice cream. That's not a sweet either.

    What about a confectionery store? Are sweet confections never called sweets in BrE?
    I'm not sure what a confectionery store is. I don't think we have them here.

    You'll usually find cakes and cookies, (or more commonly in BE 'biscuits'), sold in bakeries, cake shops, market stalls, or supermarkets. Not sweet shops.
     

    AutumnOwl

    Senior Member
    -
    Swedish
    Perhaps your language doesn't have a specific word that covers the meaning of the BE "sweets", but I think the BE speakers here have given you an answer to what they would expect to find in a "box of sweets" and cookies and cakes is not something they would expect. Sometimes the answer is how people understand a word, and in the case of "sweets" in BE Keith Bradford has explained it in #3.
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    We still have the fact that the BBC has the section titled Homemade Sweets to explain away.
    We don't have to "explain it away":( One example of such usage does not change the discussion or situation about what "a box of sweets" means in AE or BE.
    They had a list of recipes which contained both sweets and other sweet treats. The headline writer/web designer chose to use "Homemade Sweets" to cover that unusual combined category of recipes for sweets and "sweet treats". That doesn't suddenly mean that AE and BE speakers have adopted "sweet" for general use meaning sweets and sweet baked goods, if that is what you are trying to establish in the face of all the input from AE and BE speakers :eek: In Taiwan, you say the situation is different and "box of sweets" has a different meaning there than in AE/BE, but I'm sure that's not the only English word/expression that is used differently there:)
     

    raymondaliasapollyon

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    We don't have to "explain it away":( One example of such usage does not change the discussion or situation about what "a box of sweets" means in AE or BE.
    They had a list of recipes which contained both sweets and other sweet treats. The headline writer/web designer chose to use "Homemade Sweets" to cover that unusual combined category of recipes for sweets and "sweet treats". That doesn't suddenly mean that AE and BE speakers have adopted "sweet" for general use meaning sweets and sweet baked goods, if that is what you are trying to establish in the face of all the input from AE and BE speakers :eek: In Taiwan, you say the situation is different and "box of sweets" has a different meaning there than in AE/BE, but I'm sure that's not the only English word/expression that is used differently there:)
    Where on that BBC page did you see the headline writer or anyone else for that matter make such a distinction between 'sweets' and sweet things as you're trying to establish here?

    I have't said a box of cakes and other sweet things is called a box of sweets in Taiwan. I only asked what it would be called.
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    Where on that BBC page did you see the headline writer or anyone else for that matter make such a distinction between 'sweets' and sweet things as you're trying to establish here?
    Because I looked at the recipes and some were for what BE speakers would call "sweets" and some were for cookies and other things the site called sweet treats, rather than sweets. That is one occasion and I am not the one trying to establish anything here.

    I have't said a box of cakes and other sweet things is called a box of sweets in Taiwan. I only asked what it would be called.
    On re-reading, you are right you did not assert exactly that.
    In Taiwan, it is common for guests at a wedding reception to receive a box of sweet foods containing candies and cookies individually packaged in packets. Would you refer to it as "a box of sweets"?
    The answer to that has been a resounding "NO". End of story:)
     

    raymondaliasapollyon

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    Because I looked at the recipes and some were for what BE speakers would call "sweets" and some were for cookies and other things the site called sweet treats, rather than sweets. That is one occasion and I am not the one trying to establish anything here.

    On re-reading, you are right you did not assert exactly that.
    The answer to that has been a resounding "NO". End of story:)
    Some recipes were for "sweets". Some were for cookies and other things.
    But would you deny that "sweets" are also "sweet treats"? A priori, the reverse is not necessarily true, but not necessarily false either.
    That's the crux of the question. When we see something is called a sweet treat, does that mean it is definitely not "sweets"?
     
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