a boycott of this measure

SuprunP

Senior Member
Ukrainian & Russian
It should be noted that a boycott of this measure will be disastrous, to say the least.
(Yours truly)

Is this sentence, lacking any surrounding context, intrinsically ambiguous?


1) [...] This special preventive measure should be approved by all members of the committee in order to achieve our ultimate goal. It should be noted that a boycott of this measure will be disastrous, to say the least.

2) [...] All major unions are unanimous on this point. It should be noted that a boycott of this measure (proportion) will be disastrous, to say the least.

Thanks.
 
  • Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    It took me several minutes to see what you meant by 2. I don't think I've ever heard someone refer to the size of a boycott.
     

    JustKate

    Moderate Mod
    Ohhhhh, now I get it. The first three times I read your sentence, SuprunP, I thought measure was being used to mean "piece of legislation." So yes, I think it is confusing. Rather than measure, how about magnitude?
     

    Parla

    Member Emeritus
    English - US
    I don't think one can boycott either a measure OR a magnitude. The sentence makes no sense to me. Have you looked up boycott, Suprun? What do you mean by it?
     

    SuprunP

    Senior Member
    Ukrainian & Russian
    Thank you all!

    How can you boycott a measure?
    By refusing to implement a measure?

    Che received a threatening letter from "Sierra" Oltuski, the July 26 coordinator for Las Villas, ordering him to abort the robbery plan.
    [...]
    [Che:] According to the person who brought me the letter, the local leaderships in the towns are threatening to resign. I agree that they should do so. Even more, I demand it now, since it is impermissible to have a deliberate boycott of a measure that would be so beneficial to the interests of the revolution.

    (Jon Lee Anderson; Che Guevara: A Revolutionary Life)


    Rather than measure, how about magnitude?
    Sure, JustKate, magnitude takes out the ambiguity, but I was trying to be deliberately ambiguous by using measure (on top of that, without having used it in the second sentence, I wouldn't have been able to ask this not very smart question :)

    I don't think one can boycott either a measure OR a magnitude. The sentence makes no sense to me. Have you looked up boycott, Suprun? What do you mean by it?
    Which one doesn't make sense to you?

    Concerning the first one I think the meaning is close to what is being conveyed in the extract above, whatever it may be.
    Regarding the second one I do not mean 'to boycott a magnitude', but rather 'refer to the size of a boycott', as Myridon noticed.

    With all due respect, Parla, there is no need to question my having looked up boycott, although my having fully apprehended its concept and how one should use it might be debatable.
     
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