a branch (in / of) the tree

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wanabee

Senior Member
Japanese
Dear all,

Her son climbed to a branch (in / of) the tree and sat on it.

I made up the sentence. Which preposision would you use, 'in' or 'of'?
I would appreciate any comments.
 
  • sb70012

    Senior Member
    Azerbaijani/Persian
    We usually use branch of when talking about one part of a large subject of study or knowledge.
    a branch of mathematics/physics/biology etc

    I would say: "Her son climbed up into a branch and sat on it." (it's clear that we are talking about a tree, then it's no need to use the word tree)

    Just an opinion
     

    tepatria

    Senior Member
    Canadian English
    Dear all,

    Her son climbed to a branch (in / of) the tree and sat on it.

    I made up the sentence. Which preposition would you use, 'in' or 'of'?
    I would appreciate any comments.
    Her son climbed to a branch in the tree and sat on it.
    In this context I would use in, although of is also grammatically correct . I do not agree with sb that you should omit the words the tree. Bushes have branches, so do rivers and financial institutions:).
     

    PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    Her son climbed up to a branch of the tree and sat on it.

    However, there is no context; why would anyone say that?

    I would expect, "Her son climbed up the tree and sat on a branch."
     

    sdgraham

    Senior Member
    USA English
    I would say: "Her son climbed up into a branch and sat on it." (it's clear that we are talking about a tree, then it's no need to use the word tree)
    This implies that somebody bored a huge hole into a branch so that this fellow could climb inside it. A squirrel might find a hole to fit in, but I doubt that a human could. :)
     
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