A breve mi trasferirò

Katiolina

Senior Member
Ciao a tutti,
vorrei sapere come posso tradurre la frase "a breve mi trasferirò a Londra"...

Credo che la frase corretta debba contenere "will" ma purtroppo nel mio corso di inglese non ho ancora studiato il futuro!!!

Quindi...

"I will move to London in short-time" è corretto?
oppure "I will come to London in short-time" ???

O semplicemente "I will come to London"???

Grazie mille per il vostro aiuto!!!
Katia.
 
  • giovannino

    Senior Member
    Italian, Neapolitan
    Could any of the native speakers tell us what different nuances (if any) are involved in the choice of one of the following options over the others?

    I'm moving to London soon

    I'm going to move to London soon

    I'll move to London soon

    I'll be moving to London soon

    Thanks:)
     

    k_georgiadis

    Senior Member
    English (AE)
    I'm moving to London = suggests immediacy, the present time (I'll be moving this week, this month)

    I don't see much difference between "I'm going to move to London soon" and "I'll move to London soon."

    I'll be moving = suggests a process; "Soon I'll be moving to London and therefore I would not be able to complete this project." In other words, "I'll be in the process of making this move."

    There are probably other opinions on these which Giovannino correctly described as nuances.

    Note that "to transfer" is a perfectly common verb with regard to corporate relocations (yes, you can also use "to relocate."

    "In 1999 my company transferred me to the Singapore office."
    "In 1999 we relocated Mr. XXX to our corporate headquarters."
     

    Alxmrphi

    Senior Member
    UK English
    *I'm moving to London soon
    - It's been planned, my heart is set on it

    *I'm going to move to London soon
    - I seriously think I will do it

    *I'll move to London soon

    - I want to, I don't know when, I just need to wait for the right time

    *I'll be moving to London soon
    - When what I'm doing now has finished, nearly all planned

    ___________________________________

    This is what I see in the difference nuances between them.
    (Generally)
     

    Alxmrphi

    Senior Member
    UK English
    Oh let me stress these are minute nuances, they virtually are all the same thing and express exactly the same thing, it's just by knowing people's circumstances, it usually changes what they say when it comes to it.

    None of those sentences are "different" per se but the situations you're in when you want to say that "one" thing usually mean more or less, applies to what I wrote.

    Vorrò mangiare del cibo
    Vorrò andare a mangiare del cibo
    Andrò a mangiare del cibo

    All these will have slightly different nuances in Italian right?
     

    giovannino

    Senior Member
    Italian, Neapolitan
    Vorrò mangiare del cibo
    Vorrò andare a mangiare del cibo
    Andrò a mangiare del cibo

    All these will have slightly different nuances in Italian right?
    Alex

    First of all, as I think MF once mentioned, we don't use "cibo" very often in this context. I'd just say "andrò a mangiare qualcosa".

    Secondly, we wouldn't use "vorrò" in your sentences. The only instance I can think of where the future of "volere" would be used in a sentence similar to yours is:

    Sono stati in giro tutto il giorno. Quando torneranno vorranno mangiare qualcosa (they will probably want to have something to eat)
     

    bobbyjoe

    New Member
    English, United States
    1. I'm moving to London soon
    2. I'm going to move to London soon
    3. I'll move to London soon
    4. I'll be moving to London soon

    To my (AE) ear, there is no difference between 1, 2, and 4. They all sound nice and natural.

    I might say to a friend who lives in London:
    "I've got great news: I'm moving to London soon."
    "I've got great news: I'm going to move to London soon."
    "I've got great news: I'll be moving to London soon."

    In this context, I would not say 3. There may be a context in which it sounds better, but I can't think of one.

    I hope that this is helpful, not confusing!
     

    Alxmrphi

    Senior Member
    UK English
    I might say to a friend who lives in London:
    "I've got great news: I'm moving to London soon."
    "I've got great news: I'm going to move to London soon."
    "I've got great news: I'll be moving to London soon."
    I agree, but the difference in your case to mine is the context of "I've got great news" (I am confident this is thing that I am about to tell you is definitely going to happen...) - without that, it can be open to other posibilities.
     
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