A "bridging context" of an ancient book

Araukano

Senior Member
español, Chile
Hi. I had to repost this, cause I can't really get the exact sense of the term "bridging " in this phrase. It is used in a description of a commentary about the book in the Bible. It says that one of the aspects of the commentary is it gives a "bridging context" of the book. Could it be kind of "contexto de acercamiento", in the sense of getting the reader closer to the book? or maybe it refers to the exact/precise/particular context?

Chileno has told me that it means the book brings both books closer, but I guess the word refers to some bridging between the biblical book and its context. But in what sense?

Thanks a lot
 
  • bambooozler

    Senior Member
    English
    The verve to bridge normally means bringing something closer, this is certain for example 'to bridge the gap between two generations of people' means to bring these two together. In this case It means two things depending on the context itself:

    either

    The comentary helps you get closer to the book spiritually for example.

    or

    The comentary helps you to understand the book better.

    If I had to choose I would go with the first explanation.
    I hope this helps.
     

    Araukano

    Senior Member
    español, Chile
    Thank you two.
    Bambooozler, I think your second explanation fits better, for it says that other to aspects of the book are original meaning and contemporary significance, the latter being related to your first otpion, I guess.
    Thans a lot.
     

    GeorgePBurdell

    New Member
    English
    Well, I'm only eight years late to this party, I hope I can still contribute something on this ancient thread! Firstly, Araukano, I should say that you're likely looking at a fairly scholarly Bible commentary. The classic high-quality expository commentary--the kind that could cost over $1000 and feature over a dozen volumes--has three parts for each passage: 1) an original context which describes what the issue was that the writer was writing about, 2) one or more bridging contexts which analyze what senses of the passage are strictly related to the persons and events of the times, versus what senses of the passage are timeless, and 3) taking that timeless part and showing how the passage can be applied today. So, in a nutshell, the answer to your question of "what is a bridging context" is this: the bridging context provides the sense of the passage that goes beyond just the lives and times of the original scripture to show how the passage can be used today. There are several high-quality Bible commentaries that follow this formula or a variation thereon: the NIV Application Commentary follows this formula precisely, even calling the bridging context literally the "bridging context." The Fortress Commentary does much the same thing. Feasting on the Word commentary on the Protestant Revised Common Lectionary follows the formula generally, but breaks the problem into four pieces rather than the conventional three pieces.
     
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