a bubbling bottle of Coke

Nightowll

Senior Member
Italian
There is a bottle of bubbling liquid, be it coke, beer or detergent. You like the product and you are going to drink/use it.

Can we say both "a bubbling bottle of coke" and "a bottle of bubbling coke"? I wondered if we could because we can say both "a hot cup of tea" and "a cup of hot tea" and the former sounds nicer.
 
  • Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    There is a bottle of bubbling liquid, be it coke, beer or detergent. You like the product and you are going to drink/use it.

    Can we say both "a bubbling bottle of coke" and "a bottle of bubbling coke"?
    I wouldn't, no. I've haven't ever read, heard or used it – and now that I have, I wouldn't consider it appropriate for your context.

    That is even more true for beer and detergent. "Coke" is a brand name and is capitalized.
     

    Orble

    Senior Member
    Australian English
    It is actually rare even to say, “a bottle of bubbling coke” since it does not bubble in the bottle, only when you pour it out. But “a bubbling bottle of coke” sounds even stranger. (Perhaps it is an open bottle that someone shook up and threw at you!).

    Using “bubbly” rather than “bubbling” is more likely to communicate the idea that a drink has the potential to bubble but isn’t doing it now. For example, reaching for the supermarket shelf I might say to my wife,
    “Do you want a bubbly mineral water or a still one?” :thumbsup:
    “Do you want a bubbling mineral water or a still one?” :thumbsdown:

    Notice that with a “hot cup of tea” the tea is hot and the cup is hot. I also feel that a “cup of tea” somehow creates a phrasal unit that it seems natural to add adjectives in front of without disturbing it. (Someone might come along very shortly with a greater knowledge of grammar and shoot that down though. Go for it, everyone!)

    Considering something like “a poisonous flask of liquid” might tell us more. I would be much more likely to say, “a flask of poisonous liquid” since it is the liquid that is poisonous not the flask.
     

    Nightowll

    Senior Member
    Italian
    It is actually rare even to say, “a bottle of bubbling coke” since it does not bubble in the bottle, only when you pour it out. But “a bubbling bottle of coke” sounds even stranger. (Perhaps it is an open bottle that someone shook up and threw at you!).
    :D

    Thanks for the answer!

    I also found this expression: With the holiday season in full swing, you've likely seen your fair share of dramatic toasts over bubbling glasses of Champagne. How to save your leftover Champagne - Business Insider
    Can "bubbling glasses of Champagne" be correct? Or should it be avoided like "a bubbling bottle of Coke," which shouldn't be used?
     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    I think "bubbling glasses of champagne" is fine ... indeed, champagne is often referred to as simply "bubbly," but I wouldn't use "bubbly glasses of champagne."

    The lowercased "champagne" is correct.
     

    dojibear

    Senior Member
    English - Northeast US
    Glasses of champagne do bubble. If you watch one, you'll see dozens of bubbles, at any moment, just like in this picture.

    champagneglasses-lowres-lineup.jpg

    Glasses designed for holding champagne come in different shapes. The second from the left is the most traditional shape.

    When a liquid has a dissolved gas in it, bubbles form around imperfections. For that reason, glasses designed for champagne have a slightly rough inside surface -- they have many tiny imperfections, to make bubbles happen more often.

    Champagne bottles don't have those imperfections: their insides are smooth. There is no purpose to having it bubble in the bottle. In fact, the inside of the bottle has a high air pressure (held in by a cork), to prevent the dissolved gas from leaving the liquid.
     
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