a bunch of

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presl

Senior Member
Hi! :)

In this context, does “a bunch of “ mean “a number of”, “a group of”, or “a considerable amount of” ?

See definition 2, http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/bunch Thanks for your help.


(Prison Break)

Officer Bellick: Hey, we got a bunch of overheated cons getting loud in the
A-Wing.

Doctor Sara: I don't blame them. It's an oven in there.

Officer Bellick: Everything's under control, but you should go back to the infirmary building. ... ...
 
  • cuchuflete

    Senior Member
    EEUU-inglés
    AE uses 'a bunch of' to describe many things. In this case it means 'quite a few' or 'a group of' convicts. A bunch of is generally more than a couple, and fewer than a crowd.
    How's that for an imprecise definition?
     

    Titi Hilda

    Senior Member
    spanish
    In the United states we say: A bunch of flowers without reference to the number of flowers there may be.

    We also use a bunch of when we refer to a group of individuals.
     

    Forero

    Senior Member
    It depends on the intonation. If bunch is stressed, it means "considerable number"; if not, it means "group". Either way, "a bunch of ...s" is plural (if used as a subject) just like "a number of ...s."
     

    presl

    Senior Member
    AE uses 'a bunch of' to describe many things. In this case it means 'quite a few' or 'a group of' convicts. A bunch of is generally more than a couple, and fewer than a crowd.
    How's that for an imprecise definition?
    Hi! cuchuflete, Titi Hilda and Forero,

    Thanks a lot for your explanation! I know how to use this word this time!

    Thank you!

    :)
     

    zaffy

    Senior Member
    Polish
    Does 'a bunch of' work with both countable and uncountable nouns?

    -I've got a bunch of books to read over the weekend.
    -I've got a bunch of work to do over the weekend.
     
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