a butter / a packet of butter

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emre aydın

Senior Member
Turkish
Hello people. "Butter" is an uncountable noun. But, for example, when you are at a grocery, do you always say "I want to buy a packet of butter" or do you ever informally say "a butter" instead, referrin to a packet of butter. Thank you.
 
  • Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    I'd normally say "some butter". If I wanted to specify one packet it would be "a packet of butter" (or "tub", depending on how it was packaged).
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    I ask for "some butter", but normally I would ask for the brand by name: A large unsalted XXX please. Yes, the 500 gram one.

    (crosstoasted)
     

    Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    I'd ask for it by weight and the brand name. The butter I buy is in a tub, I think they're called, a plastic rectangular box.

    Although I'm perfectly familiar with metrics, having spent many years in Europe, I still refer to amounts using the Imperial system, as do even much younger Brits who were not brought up with it. So I'd specify a pound of butter and get a 500-gram tub.
    I checked the spelling, because I wanted to write 'grammes'. It seems this is an older spelling that's being replaced by grams.

    Not that I ever do, because I'm never in a grocery store that's not self-service. I don't even know where there is one.
     
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