A cadet or an undergraduate student at West Point

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JBPARK

Senior Member
HI everyone~

I see the term "cadets" is the commonly used term referring to the high school graduates who go to West Point.

Does it sound totally awkward to call them regular "undergraduate students"?
 
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  • modulus

    Senior Member
    ইংরেজি - আমেরিক
    Generally, students in a military academy are called cadets.
    I'm not sure if West Point has a graduate program or not. I'm not even sure if that is your question.

    Can you give an example where you want to use "undergraduate student" instead of cadet?
     

    JBPARK

    Senior Member
    I will just create a scenario just for the sake of this discussion.

    Say, a professor at West Point is writing a letter of recommendation for his former pupil and he is reminiscing about the first day of the class when the student first came into his attention. In that case, do you think it would be pushing it too far if the hypothetical professor refers to him as a undergraduate student?
     

    modulus

    Senior Member
    ইংরেজি - আমেরিক
    Among all my (undergraduate) students, Kevin was...

    No, I don't think this sounds particularly odd.
     

    Egmont

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    West Point students are both: they are cadets, being trained to become officers in the U.S. Army, and undergraduate students, who will receive a bachelor's degree in engineering after four years of study. It is not incorrect to refer to them as either, though "cadet" is more common: it is generally understood that cadets are also students, but saying "student" does not imply that the person is also a cadet. However, both are correct. In the context of an academic recommendation, calling Kevin an undergraduate student is a good idea. It will focus the reader's mind on that aspect of Kevin's West Point experience.
     
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