A car ride

eno2

Senior Member
Dutch-Flemish
Hello,

The term to make a car ride
causes doubt in a few languages to me.
In Dutch:
<Ik wil een ritje maken met de auto naar het strand >
<Ik wil een autoritje maken naar het strand,
My question is: how to say that without dropping the idea of ''een ritje' (a ride)

English: I want to make a car ride to the beach (that would be OK)
Spanish: paseo, Quiero dar un paseo en coche a la playa.
Duits: Ich möchte mit dem Auto zum Strand fahren (here the ride disappeared)
French: <Je veux faire un tour//une balade en voiture à la plage
Greek: <Θέλω να πάω με αυτοκίνητο στην παραλία(here the ride disappeared)
 
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  • nimak

    Senior Member
    Macedonian
    Macedonian

    There is a verb вози (vozi) ['vᴐzi] and it means "he/she-drives", used for: cars, any vehicles, airplanes, bicycles, motorcycles...
    The verb јава (java) ['java] means "he/she-rides" and is used only for riding a horse, a donkey, or any other animal.

    So, you cannot "ride" a car in Macedonian.

    The sentence "I want to make a car ride to the beach." in Macedonian would be Сакам да се повозам [со кола] до плажата. lit. "I-want to drive [with car] to the-beach.".
     

    eno2

    Senior Member
    Dutch-Flemish
    In fact, I left the verb to ride or to drive out on purpose, to keep it more simple, because that poses its own difficulties.
    In fact, when you drove to the beach, how do you call the car ride you made then, with a noun, in Macedonian.
    I suppose in some languages there's no noun for a car ride, een autorit, une balade en voiture etc....
     

    nimak

    Senior Member
    Macedonian
    Ah I see.
    There are verbal nouns formed from the verbs вози (vozi) ['vᴐzi] "drive" and јава (java) ['java] "ride".

    возење (vozenje) ['vᴐzɛɲɛ] verbal noun, "driving", "ride", "a car ride"

    Examples:
    Ќе одам на возење. (Ḱe odam na vozenje.) = lit. "Will I-go on driving."; "I will go to make a car ride."
    Бев на возење. (Bev na vozenje.) = lit. "I-was on driving."; "I went to make a car ride."
    Бев на возење до плажата. (Bev na vozenje do plažata.) = lit. "I-was on driving to the-beach."
     
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    Perseas

    Senior Member
    Greek
    Greek: <Θέλω να πάω με αυτοκίνητο στην παραλία(here the ride disappeared)
    Also: Θέλω να πάω/κάνω μία βόλτα με το αυτοκίνητο στην παραλία.

    «βόλτα» does someone also with a bicycle, a motorcycle, it's also a walk.
     
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    eno2

    Senior Member
    Dutch-Flemish
    Walking yes. It's walk, a walk, a trip, go, everything but a ride in many languages, it seems
    πριν καιρό, έκανα μια βόλτα στo φεγγάρι με ένα φίλη μου ελληνικά
    That wasn't a car ride....
    Google Translates that as: some time ago, I made a walk on the moon with my girlfriend Greek
     
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    Dymn

    Senior Member
    A "paseo", or a "vuelta" is a stroll, some route without two fixed points, just for the sake of it. If I understand it correctly, that's not the meaning of a "car ride" in English. In that context, I'd simply say "quiero ir en coche a la playa". To define the car ride with a noun, I think I'd say "un trayecto", but it's not really a true equivalent of a "ride" in English.
     

    eno2

    Senior Member
    Dutch-Flemish
    "βόλτα με το αυτοκίνητο" is a car ride.
    βόλτα=walk, stroll, ride
    Absolutely, I knew the word βόλτα and its meaning.

    to use "βόλτα is to say it with a noun. But it is, unlike car ride and autorit in English and Dutch, not derived from nor semantically linked to the verbs to ride or to drive.

    In Greek, to drive and also to steer is οδηγώ

    In the Κύριες μεταφράσεις of βόλτα it is all
    Stroll amble walkabout walk περίπατος
    ambulation περιπλάνηση τριγύρισμα
    going out n το να βγαίνεις έξω
    look in επίσκεψη
    wander περπάτημα

    and at the very end> ride, trip διαδρομή (καθομιλουμένη) αυτοκινητάδα
    So I learned the word αυτοκινητάδα there , which was
    what I sought for.

    I'd simply say "quiero ir en coche a la playa".
    Exactly. Also a verbal way to say it as opposed to with a noun. IR has so many uses. First meaning is marchar pero indique forma de transporte. Ir en avión, en bicicleta, en caballo, en tren ademas que en pie.
     

    merquiades

    Senior Member
    English (USA Northeast)
    "To take a ride (make a ride) in a car" (se balader en voiture) puts emphasis on the enjoyment of being in the car: watching scenery, listening to music, having good company, driving etc. If you "take a ride to the beach" the beach is the destination but you are going to enjoy the whole experience. It's not clear if you are driving or are the passenger, because "to ride in a car" generally means just that you are a passenger, not the driver. For example, we also say "to ride the bus", "to take a ride in the bus".
    "To give someone a ride" is to transport someone somewhere in your car.
     

    eno2

    Senior Member
    Dutch-Flemish
    Make a car ride is not OK? I'm surprised... It gets 852.000 hits in Google. Against 1.110.000 for "take a car ride". That's close to evenly distributed.
    'I make' stresses that I drove myself. With 'I take', it's not clear who drives indeed.

    Let me change 'the car' to 'my car', to disambiguate who drives=>
    <Ik wil een ritje maken met MIJN auto naar het strand >
    So that would be (literally) :
    I want to take a car drive with my car to the beach.
    Which means with 'take', I'd have to use two times 'car' to disambiguate....

    My original question was the Dutch phrase that I put in the OP but not in the title. Because I thought it was easier to respond to when I put the English translation in the title. My concern was if there was a way to say that in your language without dropping the use of the noun ''een ritje' (a ride). Or if you had to use another, perhaps verbal construction.

    In English, no matter if you use 'to make' or 'to take', you can say it without having to drop the noun.
     
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    merquiades

    Senior Member
    English (USA Northeast)
    Are you stressing the driving part, the riding part or the beach part?
    I want to take a drive down to the beach (in my car).
    You don't need to use car two times, well actually not even one time, because we assume it's a car.
    Again this shows that you are enjoying it.

    Maybe you should put the Dutch in the title to make sure you get the best results....
     

    eno2

    Senior Member
    Dutch-Flemish
    yes, it suggest enjoyment, said that way.
    . When saying: <I want to drive to the beach with my car>', would that also suggest enjoyment? Or not? Or less?
    Nevertheless:
    I'm stressing the 'noun' part. "A car ride'
    It was to stress it was a car ride, not a bus or motorbike ride, and that I drive myself.

    I'm also mixing up 'a ride' and 'a drive' all the time. What about that? are they interchangeable?

    Look at what I edited in #11 about the aim of my consultation:
    My concern was if there was a way to say that in your language without dropping the use of the noun ''een ritje' (a ride). Or if you had to use another, perhaps verbal construction.
    Maybe you should put the Dutch in the title to make sure you get the best results....
    And the least responses.
    It's no coincidence that all the thread titles on the top page here are in English. (I didn't look further).
     
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    merquiades

    Senior Member
    English (USA Northeast)
    I want to drive my car to the beach, I want to drive to the beach in my car.. You are the person behind the wheel
    I want to ride (with you) to the beach. I want a ride to the beach (in your car). You are the passenger.
    This works with cars

    I want to ride the train to the beach. I want to ride the bus to the beach. You are a passenger because you don't drive anything.

    I want to ride to the beach. Stresses movement... it can be by bus, train, horse, bicycle.

    With transportation you don't make/ create anything. You take the bus/the train, you take a flight, you take a trip/ journey/ vacation, you take a swim, you take a cruise/ boat/ ferry, you take a ride/ drive/ run / walk/ stroll.
     
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    eno2

    Senior Member
    Dutch-Flemish
    Thanks

    That's all clear to me.

    but I was switching all the time between 'a car drive' and 'a car ride', when posting. I had to edit back to 'a car ride'
    I know I don't ride a car. I ride a horse or a motorbike..
    You ride a bike.
    <Riding is sitting ON a particular vehicle while you control it's movements.
    Whereas driving is sitting IN a particular vehicle while you control it's movements.
    So you drive a car and ride a bike. >I am driving a bike or I am riding a bike? Which one is grammatically correct? - Quora
    .
     

    merquiades

    Senior Member
    English (USA Northeast)
    Thanks

    That's all clear to me.

    but I was switching all the time between 'a car drive' and 'a car ride', when posting. I had to edit back to 'a car ride'
    I know I don't ride a car. I ride a horse or a motorbike..
    You ride a bike.
    <Riding is sitting ON a particular vehicle while you control it's movements.
    Whereas driving is sitting IN a particular vehicle while you control it's movements.
    So you drive a car and ride a bike. >I am driving a bike or I am riding a bike? Which one is grammatically correct? - Quora
    .
    That's all fine. It's another way of looking at it. In that case, "Ride" is also sitting in or on a vehicle when you have no control of its movements.
     

    Awwal12

    Senior Member
    Russian
    In Russian it's поездка на автомобиле (literally ~~ "a ride on a car"). However it should be noted that the source verb "ездить" is rather close to German "fahren" ("to go by some land transport"), and Russian lacks its specific analogue for "reiten" (i.e. exactly "to ride") entirely. "Driving" is, in turn, limited to a transitive verb which describes active driving of some self-propelled non-railroad vehicle (literally "leading a vehicle").

    Basically Rusians just go/walk by foot, *fahren* by cars, trains and horses, swim/float by ships (or by themselves, in the water), and fly by planes.
     
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