A carpet impervious to rough treatment.

Fictional

Senior Member
India - Hindi
Hi all,

I was looking for the meaning of impervious in Merriam Webster and there I saw the following sentence:

A carpet impervious to rough treatment.


Since impervious is an adjective, shouldn't it be written in following manner:

1. A carpet which is impervious to rough treatment.
2. The carpet is impervious to rough treatment.

Or is it fine the way it's written?
 
  • entangledbank

    Senior Member
    English - South-East England
    It's not a sentence: there is no verb in it. This is a noun phrase. We wouldn't just say 'an impervious carpet', because it's unclear - what is it impervious to? So the adjective needs its own dependent, 'impervious to rough treatment'. When an adjective phrase contains a dependent after the adjective, like this, it goes after the noun.

    Similarly: a visible colour; but a colour visible to bees. A free beer; but a dog free of fleas.
     
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