a cat-and-mouse game <pitting...>

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hack3rcon

Senior Member
Russian
Hello.
I'm reading Mafiaboy book and I want to know what does below text men? Can it mean "A cat-and-mouse game played by mysterious Alex against Federal Bureau of Investigation agents and Bloomberg employees that was under FBI control" ?
"Thus began a cat-and-mouse game pitting the mysterious Alex against Federal Bureau of Investigation agents and Bloomberg employees acting under F.B.I. direction".
I can't understand "pitting".


Thank you.
 
  • Barque

    Banned
    Tamil
    A cat-and mouse game is defined in the WR dictionary.
    play cat and mouse, to engage in a gamelike relationship in which evasion and pursuit are used:They played cat and mouse for a while before she consented to go out with him.

    Alex was on one side and FBI agents along with Bloomberg employees under FBI control were on the other.

    "Pit" as used in this context is also in the WR dictionary.
    Pit - to set (two opponents) in combat: The candidates were pitted against each other.

    Here, the cat-and-mouse game they were engaged in set the two sides against each other.
     

    hack3rcon

    Senior Member
    Russian
    A cat-and mouse game is defined in the WR dictionary.
    play cat and mouse, to engage in a gamelike relationship in which evasion and pursuit are used:They played cat and mouse for a while before she consented to go out with him.

    Alex was on one side and FBI agents along with Bloomberg employees under FBI control were on the other.

    "Pit" as used in this context is also in the WR dictionary.
    Pit - to set (two opponents) in combat: The candidates were pitted against each other.

    Here, the cat-and-mouse game they were engaged in set the two sides against each other.
    Thus, I'm on a right way.

    Thank you so much.
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    The verb "pitting" is originally derived from animal fighting.

    A pit was dug or created with fencing and the two fighting animals were placed in the pit to fight. These fights usually were dog vs. dog or fighting cock (bird) vs. fighting cock.

    "Pitting" has come to mean a pitched battle with some sort of boundaries so neither combatant can escape.

    Online Etymology Dictionary

    pit (v.)
    mid-15c., "to put into a pit," from pit (n.1); especially for purposes of fighting (of cocks, dogs, pugilists) from 1760. Figurative sense of "to set in rivalry" is from 1754. Meaning "to make pits in" is from late 15c. Related: Pitted; pitting. Compare Pit-bull as a dog breed attested from 1922, short for pit-bull terrier (by 1912). This also is the notion behind the meaning "the part of a theater on the floor of the house" (1640s).
     
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