a certain amount of time which before the class starts

gimhee

Senior Member
Korean
I want to combine two sentences

1. There is a certain amount of time
2. You have to arrive at school a certain amount of time before the class stars.

as in

1. there was a dog
2. I really loved the dog

there was a dog which i really loved


there is a certain amount of time which before the class starts you have to arrive at school.

Is this correct? or is there any other way to combine two sentences?
 
Last edited:
  • gimhee

    Senior Member
    Korean
    "You have to arrive at school a certain amount of time before class starts"
    I want to start the sentence with 'there is a certain amount of time'~

    as in

    1. there was a dog
    2. I really loved the dog

    there was a dog which i really loved
     

    Cenzontle

    Senior Member
    English, U.S.
    "There is a certain amount of time before class starts that you must arrive at school."
    This is how I would combine them, but I"m not happy with this sentence: it's awkward.
    I don't want to say "during which". Here's why:
    If classes begin at 9 o'clock, and the "certain amount of time" is a half hour,
    then you need to arrive at or before 8:30. But arriving during that half hour would be satisfied by arriving at 8:55, only 5 minutes before class time.
    I'm tempted to say your sentence #2 says all that needs to be said, and sentence #1 is unnecessary.
     

    Parla

    Member Emeritus
    English - US
    I agree with Cenzontle's conclusion. Your original sentence
    You have to arrive at school a certain amount of time before the class starts.
    says what you mean clearly and grammatically. Why do you want to change it? Your alternate construction beginning with "there is a . . . " is awkward and less direct.
     
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