a change in the wind

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MaryamSeresht

Senior Member
Persian
Greetings,

I want to know if a change in the wind here means a change in the direction of the wind? or it just means with blowing the wind, her mouth remains open?

She didn't know what he was talking about when he asked for light refreshments. She opened her mouth and it remained hanging ajar, so that he feared a change in the wind would leave her like that.
It's part of "The Unlikely Pilgrimage of Harold Fry"by Rachel Joyce, British writer.

Thank you.
 
  • Keith Bradford

    Senior Member
    English (Midlands UK)
    << --- Response to vanished post --- >>

    But the phrase refers to the old saying "Don't pull faces - the wind might change and you'll stick like it". Nobody knows what it means, but we all suppose it means "direction".
     
    Last edited by a moderator:

    JustKate

    Senior Member
    Greetings,

    I want to know if a change in the wind here means a change in the direction of the wind? or it just means with blowing the wind, her mouth remains open?



    It's part of "The Unlikely Pilgrimage of Harold Fry"by Rachel Joyce, British writer.

    Thank you.
    This isn't clear to me either, but I think all it's saying is that her mouth was hanging open an extraordinarily long time. A change in wind is sometimes used to mean "important changes are occuring," and I think that's what is being referred to here.

    (Cross-posted with Keith)
     
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