a < check(ed) / plaid / striped > shirt

uncharted

Senior Member
Arabic
<< --- What's the difference between a checked shirt and a plaid shirt? --- >>

They all mean the same, but which one is common?

And what about striped shirt?
 
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  • Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    Checked (also check, checkered) is not plaid in US English. A check is a pattern of squares in two colors. Plaid is can be more than two colors and the stripes can be uneven sizes.
     

    natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    A check shirt in BrE is often a pattern of two colours too. The equivalent for AmE plaid in BrE is tartan. If the material is thin cotton, we usually say Madras or Madras check.
     

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    Plaid is more associated with tartan, a Gaelic pattern usually of several colours commonly seen as the material of a kilt: Picture -> http://kiltmakers.co.uk/blog/wp-content/uploads/2013/03/greatkilt.jpg

    This is checked/checkered (AE)/chequered (BE) cloth: https://img1.etsystatic.com/000/0/5407145/il_570xN.73647037.jpg Note how it is two colours, similar to a chess board (or, indeed, a checkers board.)

    This is a gingham shirt: http://thesoliloguy.files.wordpress.com/2011/09/tailored-shirts-without-leaving-chair-indochino-navy-blue-gingham.jpg?w=760 note the three colours: dark blue, a paler dark blue and white.

    This is a striped shirt: http://www.esquire.com/cm/esquire/images/bengal-stripe-0907-lg.jpg and so is this: http://www.zigoti.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/08/what-not-to-wear-with-striped-top.jpg
     
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    Pauline Meryle

    Senior Member
    English UK
    And just to confuse matters further, "plaid" seems to have entered the French language quite recently as a word for "blanket" or "throw" (soft furnishings). "Plaids" may be plain, checked or with any other pattern.
     
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    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    And just to confuse matters further, "plaid" seems to have entered the French language quite recently as a word for "blanket" or "throw" (soft furnishings). "Plaids" may be plain, checked or with any other pattern.
    That is very interesting, OED
    plaid: Etymology: Origin uncertain; perhaps < the past participle of ply v.1 (compare forms at that entry), with original sense ‘a folded blanket or cloth’. Compare Scottish Gaelic plaide blanket, plaid (not tartan), coarse flannel (1659 or earlier), probably < Scots (see note below). Compare also Irish pluid blanket, perhaps a recent borrowing < Scottish Gaelic.
     

    RM1(SS)

    Senior Member
    English - US (Midwest)
    The strip of material this piper has wrapped around his body, with the ends hanging from his shoulder, is the "blanket, plaid (not tartan)" in the OED definition.
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    Here's the wiki entry for "tartan" (my bold)
    Tartan is a pattern consisting of criss-crossed horizontal and vertical bands in multiple colours. Tartans originated in woven wool, but now they are made in many other materials. Tartan is particularly associated with Scotland. Scottish kilts almost always have tartan patterns. Tartan is often called plaid in North America, but in Scotland, a plaid is a tartan cloth slung over the shoulder as a kilt accessory, or a plain ordinary blanket such as one would have on a bed.
     
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