A child being difficult, ضد

Abu Talha

Senior Member
Urdu
Hello.

In Urdu we use ضِدّ for actions of a child who is being difficult and being contrary to what people want him to do. Is some form of ضدّ used in Arabic too in this context?

الطفل مضادّ للأوامر or something similar?

If not, what are some of the common words and expressions used. I'm thinking إصرار or لجّ probably?
يصرّ الطفل على عمله و لا يسمع لوالديه.

How about a combination:
يصرّ الطفلُ ضِدَّ أوامرِ والديه.

Thanks.
 
  • Abu Talha

    Senior Member
    Urdu
    Thanks إسكندراني. Do you distinguish between being stubborn and being difficult. In my understading, a stubborn child resists doing what others want and will only do what he wants. A difficult child doesn't particularly want to do anything by himself except to go against what others want him to do.
     

    Mahaodeh

    Senior Member
    Arabic, PA and IA.
    I suppose it depends on your point of view, I for one, would think that the "difficult" child is stubborn because he wants his way, even if his way is simply doing the opposite of what his parents want. But I suppose it's me.

    Anyhow, I'd agree with عنيد.
     

    Abu Talha

    Senior Member
    Urdu
    Anyhow, I'd agree with عنيد.
    Thanks, and welcome back!

    Could the sentence الطفل عنيد be understood as, "The child is stubborn," i.e., that stubbornness is a quality in him, or could it also mean, depending on context, that he is being stubborn right now and he is not necessarily stubborn all the time?
     

    Schem

    Senior Member
    Najdi Arabic
    I agree with all, عنيد is normally used to mean disobedient or difficult. It's also used for the word's original meaning, stubborn. You can also simply use صعب which isn't that common, but I've noticed its use before.

    And the verb form of عنيد is used in my dialect as well. (e.g., يعاند)
     

    إسكندراني

    Senior Member
    عربي (مصر)ـ | en (gb)
    Looking at the title, you reminded that when someone is being stubborn or difficult (not just a child), we might say sarcastically: هوّ خالف تُعرف؟!ـ (where هوّ is a question word) or might even describe him at that moment as خالف تُعرف
     

    Abu Talha

    Senior Member
    Urdu
    You can also simply use صعب which isn't that common, but I've noticed its use before.
    We sometimes say : على هواه- على دربه on his own fancy-on his own way/attitude
    Thanks Schem, Ayed.
    Looking at the title, you reminded that when someone is being stubborn or difficult (not just a child), we might say sarcastically: هوّ خالف تُعرف؟!ـ (where هوّ is a question word) or might even describe him at that moment as خالف تُعرف
    Thanks Iskenderany. I wonder if you could also translate it literally?
     

    Schem

    Senior Member
    Najdi Arabic
    Looking at the title, you reminded that when someone is being stubborn or difficult (not just a child), we might say sarcastically: هوّ خالف تُعرف؟!ـ (where هوّ is a question word) or might even describe him at that moment as خالف تُعرف
    Strange. خالف تعرف is used in my dialect as an expression to mean someone who always likes to swim against the tide. It refers to a personality type and not to a difficult child, which in the latter can be only a passing trait.
     

    إسكندراني

    Senior Member
    عربي (مصر)ـ | en (gb)
    I think Egyptians could use خالف تُعرف both for a permanent trait and for a passing situation...

    In response to Abu Talha:
    خالِف do something against [what is expected / what others do / what is logical]
    تُعرَف to stand out / for attention / to be known
    It's an expression; we don't consider its literal meaning as I'm sure you're aware.
     
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