a chip off the old block

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parabimpimpim

Member
Ukrainian
Hello, dear friends!
I need you wisdom and knowledge again.
Could you please tell me if an idiom “a chip off the old block” is a common expression in modern English?
I mean, could you use this idiom in your daily conversation in a proper context?
I don’t have any context, I just wonder if it’s common nowadays or not.
Thank you in advance for your explanation!
 
  • Uncle Jack

    Senior Member
    British English
    It was definitely in use in Britain in the 1970s (it crops up in television programme titles, for example). However, I very much doubt it is an expression I have ever used, and I would not really expect to hear it in daily conversation.
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    It's recognizable and could be used but the situation to use it probably doesn't come up too often. A more straightforward way would just be to say "He's just like his father" or "He really takes after his father". That seems more likely in daily conversation.
     

    parabimpimpim

    Member
    Ukrainian
    It was definitely in use in Britain in the 1970s (it crops up in television programme titles, for example). However, I very much doubt it is an expression I have ever used, and I would not really expect to hear it in daily conversation.
    Dear Uncle Jack, thank you very much! It’s very useful information for me!
     

    parabimpimpim

    Member
    Ukrainian
    It's recognizable and could be used but the situation to use it probably doesn't come up too often. A more straightforward way would just be to say "He's just like his father" or "He really takes after his father". That seems more likely in daily conversation.
    Dear friend, thank you very very much! Your explanation helped me a lot! I’m very thankful!
     
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