a cleaner for a laundry

Ocham

Senior Member
Japanese
I found the following sentence in one of my reference books.

"I go to a cleaner in the neighborhood every week."

Do you often use "cleaner" for "laundry"? My dictionary says
this is an AE usage and the proper form is "cleaner's."
 
  • GreenWhiteBlue

    Senior Member
    USA - English
    I would take my cotton shirts to a laundry. I would take my wool suit to a dry cleaner's. In conversation, I might shorten that last pharse:

    I am off to the cleaner's; do you have anything you want me to take?

    I believe that even in British English (although UK members of the forum will correct me if I am wrong), the use of the possessive when referring to businesses is common:

    If you are going to the butcher's, could you buy a bone for the dog?
     

    Divinityinmotion

    New Member
    English-United States
    Yes, I believe that would be a shorter version of "dry cleaner's". And it would be used "cleaner's", not "cleaner". I don't ever hear it pronounced singularly. I usually hear "laundromat" for places that have washers and dryers for others to use.
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    Laundries wash your clothes in water with soap.

    Cleaners (also known as "dry-cleaners") use a solvent to clean the clothes. Most are using perchloroethylene, but other "greener" chemicals are now available.
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    Just as a note... in my town the dry cleaners perform both functions. I would take everything to the dry cleaner's, whether it is meant to be laundered or dry cleaned.
    In my town too, but our dry cleaner sub-contracts out the shirt laundering to a wholesale shirt laundry company.

    I think, in general, the cleaning or laundering plant would be dedicated to one process or another, but the consumer would never know the difference.

    At least one dry cleaner in our area does the shirts in house and they have the mangle machine in plain view for all to see.

    Here is what it looks like: http://www.simonsboiler.com.au/products/garment_pressing_machinery/formers/images/Trevistar5200.jpg
     
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