a clear sky vs. clear skies

bmo

Senior Member
Taiwan
1. The forecast was for a clear sky this morning.
2. The forecast was for clear skies this morning.

Question:

1. Are these 2 sentences identical in meaning?
2. What is the meaning of for, the preposition? Is it as a result of forecast?

Thanks.
 
  • dmz11

    Senior Member
    English - US
    1. The forecast was for a clear sky this morning.
    2. The forecast was for clear skies this morning.

    Question:

    1. Are these 2 sentences identical in meaning?
    2. What is the meaning of for, the preposition? Is it as a result of forecast?
    Hi bmo,

    1. Yes, they mean the same thing, practically speaking.
    2. When we say "the forecast is/was for clear skies/rain/etc.," it means: "the forecast is predicting ..." [whatever type of weather it happens to be].

    The meaning of "for" in this sentence is not isolated from the rest of the phrase. There is, however, one meaning of "for" which is similar to its import in this phrase, i.e., "in favor of." But I think most native English speakers would not mentally separate its meaning from the phrase as a whole.

    Hope that helps.
     

    bmo

    Senior Member
    Taiwan
    Thanks. I have looked through many dictionaries (www.onelook.com) for the meaning of "for" but can't find a suitable definition except one or two mentioning "as a result." It is crazy to separate its meaning from the main body, but take it as a mental exercise. Thanks again. bmo
     

    dmz11

    Senior Member
    English - US
    I have looked through many dictionaries (www.onelook.com) for the meaning of "for" but can't find a suitable definition except one or two mentioning "as a result."
    Just fyi: it definitely doesn't mean "as a result" in this case. It means something more like "indicative of."
     
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