A close city to Paris

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Jawel7

Senior Member
Turkish
Hello everyone.

I have some questions whose answers I am looking for. I hope you to help me.

Why can we say:"Close cities to Paris", but can't we say: "Familiar topics to me" ?
What are the close cities to Paris? - What are the familiar topics to you?
What is the difference between them?
Thanks.
 
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  • Florentia52

    Modwoman in the attic
    English - United States
    You have asked about several different sentence fragments here, probably too many to be discussed in one thread. Please pick one of them (or two that illustrate the same point of grammar), and provide the complete sentence, in context. We'll be happy to help, once you can provide some focus and the required information.

    (For starters, I can't think of a context in which I would say "a close city to Paris.")

    Florentia52, moderator
     

    Jawel7

    Senior Member
    Turkish
    You have asked about several different sentence fragments here, probably too many to be discussed in one thread. Please pick one of them (or two that illustrate the same point of grammar), and provide the complete sentence, in context. We'll be happy to help, once you can provide some focus and the required information.

    (For starters, I can't think of a context in which I would say "a close city to Paris.")

    Florentia52, moderator
    All of them have the same structure. They are different examples based on the same substructure. Question is easy. Is "adjective+noun+preposition+noun" equal to "noun+adjective+preposition+noun". That's it. All of them the same.
     

    Florentia52

    Modwoman in the attic
    English - United States
    I believe the example sentences are now intended to be "What are the close cities to Paris?" and "What are the familiar topics to you?"

    We are, however, still waiting for context.
     

    Jawel7

    Senior Member
    Turkish
    They are still not complete sentences, and there is still no context.
    I can not understand why there should be a context?
    My question is about grammar.
    "The close cities to Paris" = "The cities which are close to Paris"
    But why "the familiar topics to me" =!(not) "the topics which are familiar to me". Why?
     

    Florentia52

    Modwoman in the attic
    English - United States
    Context is required by forum rules, because it helps us understand how you would use the sentence. In that way, we can provide more accurate answers.
     

    Jawel7

    Senior Member
    Turkish
    I believe the example sentences are now intended to be "What are the close cities to Paris?" and "What are the familiar topics to you?"

    We are, however, still waiting for context.
    The close cities to France are Hungary, Austria, Italy.
    The familiar topics to me are science, history but are not sports, food. I can't talk about them.
    (for example)
     

    Florentia52

    Modwoman in the attic
    English - United States
    In your recent thread about prepositions, you used "Austria is one of the closest countries to Hungary." as an example, and were told (correctly) that it was fine. Similarly, you could ask "What are the closest cities to Paris?" We wouldn't, however, ask "What are the close cities to Paris?"

    As you were advised in your other thread, we wouldn't say "There are some familiar events to me here." The same is true for "What are the familiar topics to you?" We would be more likely to ask "Which topics are familiar to you?"
     

    Barque

    Senior Member
    Tamil
    What are the close cities to Paris?
    What are the familiar topics to you?
    I'm not sure what gives you the idea that "close cities to Paris" is used. Neither of the above sentences sound correct or natural to me.
    What are the cities close to Paris?/Which cities are close to Paris?
    What are the topics you're familiar with/familiar to you?


    (Hungary, Austria and Italy aren't cities by the way, and France doesn't have a border with the first two.)

    Cross-posted.
     
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    Jawel7

    Senior Member
    Turkish
    In your recent thread about prepositions, you used "Austria is one of the closest countries to Hungary." as an example, and were told (correctly) that it was fine. Similarly, you could ask "What are the closest cities to Paris?" We wouldn't, however, ask "What are the close cities to Paris?"

    As you were advised in your other thread, we wouldn't say "There are some familiar events to me here." The same is true for "What are the familiar topics to you?" We would be more likely to ask "Which topics are familiar to you?"
    I have already known that the example with "close" is OK for you, but the other with "familiar" is not. Why? The same grammar, the same structure.
    With the same idea, if "a safe area for children" means "an area which is safe for children", "an interesting book for you" must mean "a book which is interesting for you".
    But I am really unsure about them.
     

    Jawel7

    Senior Member
    Turkish
    I'm not sure what gives you the idea that "close cities to Paris" is used. Neither of the above sentences sound correct or natural to me.
    What are the cities close to Paris?/Which cities are close to Paris?
    What are the topics you're familiar with/familiar to you?


    Hungary, Austria and Italy aren't cities. France doesn't have a border with either Hungary or Austria.

    Cross-posted.
    Sorry for that. I know but I continuously had to change my examples because something missing is always found here. Your question is just 1 minutes but the required things are 15 minutes.
     

    Barque

    Senior Member
    Tamil
    I have already known that the example with "close" is OK for you,
    I'm not sure you've read the above two posts properly. The structure you've used in your first example sentence (close cities to Paris) does not work. The second structure (familiar topic to me/you) does not work in your example sentence but it might work in a different sentence.
    With the same idea, if "a safe area for children" means "an area which is safe for children", "an interesting book for you" must mean "a book which is interesting for you".
    As others have said above, you need to give us full sentences, not just phrases. The full sentence decides whether the phrase is correctly used or not.
     

    Florentia52

    Modwoman in the attic
    English - United States
    I have already known that the example with "close" is OK for you, but the other with "familiar" is not. Why? The same grammar, the same structure..
    Which "example with 'close'" are you referring to? No one has said "What are the close cities to Paris?" is correct.
     

    Jawel7

    Senior Member
    Turkish
    Which "example with 'close'" are you referring to? No one has said "What are the close cities to Paris?" is correct.
    The user with the nickname of "lingobingo" said: " "Austria is one of the closest countries to Hungary" works." after that, I started to think why it is correct? To me, it doesn't seem grammatical.
     

    Florentia52

    Modwoman in the attic
    English - United States
    Sentences with "interesting book for you" have already been extensively discussed in another of your earlier threads, Jawel7. If you wish to continue that discussion, please do so in that thread.

    Similarly, the discussion of "Austria is one of the closest countries to Hungary" should continue in the thread where you originally posted it.

    This thread should focus on "What are the close cities to Paris?" and "What are the familiar topics to you?" Now that you have been advised that they are both incorrect, do you have an additional question about them?
     

    dojibear

    Senior Member
    English - Northeast US
    I have already known that the example with "close" is OK for you, but the other with "familiar" is not. Why? The same grammar, the same structure.
    Grammar rules attempt to describe a real language. Grammar rules do not define a language.

    Grammar rules are not perfect, because languages are too complicated. In order to be useful, grammar rules need to be simple and consistent. Real languages are not simple and are not consistent.

    Two sentences may seem like the same grammer to you, but there are other rules that you do not know about. For example, the set of grammar rules used with "familiar to" may be different than the set of grammar rules used with "close to".

    We ask for full sentence because native speakers can often recognize "that is correct" or "that is incorrect" when looking at a full sentence. Native speakers do not apply grammer rules to figure that out.
     

    Jawel7

    Senior Member
    Turkish
    Sentences with "interesting book for you" have already been extensively discussed in another of your earlier threads, Jawel7. If you wish to continue that discussion, please do so in that thread.

    Similarly, the discussion of "Austria is one of the closest countries to Hungary" should continue in the thread where you originally posted it.

    This thread should focus on "What are the close cities to Paris?" and "What are the familiar topics to you?" Now that you have been advised that they are both incorrect, do you have an additional question about them?
    No, thank you.
     
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