a cloth embroidered all over with roses

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cheerfulscience

Senior Member
Turkish
Hi, I have many times heard and read "over" used as in the following sentence

1- a cloth embroidered all over with roses. (Excerpted from the free dictionary)

Over in the sentence 1 if I am not wrong desigmates the top surface of the cloth, and it can be rephrased as "a cloth with roses that are embroidered all over it". I wonder if we can use other positional prepositions the same way. The reason why I am asking this is I've never heard of, say,

2-a cloth embroidered all under with roses.

3- a bread filled all in with chocolate

4- a stone block smeared all on with mud

This does not necessarily mean they are wrong but simply that I have remained ignorant of them. So, do you think 2,3, 4, and the like sentences in the same form are grammatically correct?
 
  • lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    None of your inventions are idiomatic. But the phrase “all over” is widely used. In this case it means “completely covering”, but it has various other applications too.

    The kids have left their toys all over the floor
    The bedspread was embroidered all over with a rose design
    People all over the borough are complaining about the rise in council tax​
     

    cheerfulscience

    Senior Member
    Turkish
    None of your inventions are idiomatic. But the phrase “all over” is widely used. In this case it means “completely covering”, but it has various other applications too.

    The kids have left their toys all over the floor
    The bedspread was embroidered all over with a rose design
    People all over the borough are complaining about the rise in council tax​
    ... so you could also have:

    3a- a loaf coated all over with chocolate
    4a- a stone block smeared all over with mud
    I see. Then it must be because none of them is idiomatic that I haven't heard of them, but are they grammatically correct? I mean, apart from their sounding weird, would they be considered grammatical mistakes outright or merely strange ways of expression?

    Thanks
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    They make no sense. They are not expressions in use by native English speakers. As has been pointed out many times on this forum, it is more than possible to concoct a sentence that breaks no grammatical rules or conventions but is nevertheless gobbledygook. :)
     
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