A coffee and a cheese cake, please.

mikichan

Senior Member
Chinese
I've read other similar threads but they did not answer my question.
I'd really appreciate it if you could help me figure this out.

How precise should I be to order food?

How would you as a native speaker order them?


Is "A coffee and a cheese cake, please." colloquial, or should I say "a piece of cheese cake"??

Also, can I say "A coffee and cheese cake, please"??

(I know you can say "a coffee" to order it but not sure about the cake.)

Thank you!
 
  • srk

    Senior Member
    English - US
    I think all three of your questions would be understood the same way. If there's any doubt about quantity, whoever is waiting on you should help you with your order: "Do you want a cup of coffee or a carafe?" "Do you want the regular-size slice or the larger one for just fifty cents more?"
     

    mikichan

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    Thank you srk. Would native speakers say "A coffee and a cheese cake, please." or, would only non-native speakers say it?
     

    mikichan

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    Thank you Parla. May I ask if you mean that you treat coffee as uncountable and usually say:

    "What can I get for you today?"

    "Coffee please." or "I'll have coffee."

    Would you treat food as uncountable too, such as cake to order it in some obvious situations, ex. you only see one piece left in the glass fridge/display case?

    Thank you in advance.
     

    Smauler

    Senior Member
    British English
    You don't have to be precise to order food. Often simple, direct things work better.

    Coffee and cheese cake please is fine.... don't worry about asking for a piece, they're all in pieces already.

    I don't think I've ever bought cheese cake, though, so don't rely on my advice.
     

    Enquiring Mind

    Senior Member
    English - the Queen's
    Hi mikichan, "a coffee and a cheesecake" sounds the most natural to me. It's understood that you mean "a cup of coffee and a piece of cheesecake". You could, of course, say it in full, if you wanted. "Cheesecake" is almost always written as one word (in BE, at least) these days.

    You could also just ask for "coffee and cheesecake, please". There's no risk of being misunderstood if you are the only person ordering the refreshments.
     

    estoy_lerniendo

    Senior Member
    English - U.S. (Midwest)
    Hi mikichan, "a coffee and a cheesecake" sounds the most natural to me. It's understood that you mean "a cup of coffee and a piece of cheesecake". :thumbsup: You could, of course, say it in full, if you wanted. "Cheesecake" is almost always written as one word (in BE, at least) these days. :thumbsup: (US, too, as far as I know)

    You could also just ask for "coffee and cheesecake, please". There's no risk of being misunderstood if you are the only person ordering the refreshments. :thumbsup:
    Yes, "I would like a coffee and a cheesecake" is fine, of course assuming that the restaurant has single-slice servings of cheesecake on the menu.
     

    mikichan

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    Thank you so much Enquiring Mind for your answer and pointing out my mistake for "cheesecake. "

    Maybe that is what Smauler meant:)

    Thank you again!

    Thank you estoy_lerniendo!
     
    Last edited by a moderator:

    RM1(SS)

    Senior Member
    English - US (Midwest)
    I would say "a coffee and cheesecake" if I were ordering in a restaurant. I would only say "a cheesecake" if I meant an entire cheesecake, not just a piece.
     

    roxcyn

    Senior Member
    USA
    American English [AmE]
    I would like a cup of coffee and a piece of cheesecake, please.
    I would like coffee and cheesecake, please.

    These are two phrases I would use in a restaurant setting.

    "Coffee and cheesecake, please" works, too.
     

    natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    I'm fine with both 'I'll have a coffee and a cheesecake, please', 'I'll have coffee and cheesecake, please'. If you're seated and clearly not ordering a take-away, I think 'a cheesecake' can only mean a slice of it.

    When the waiter reads out the order to you, they'll often say 'One coffee, one cheesecake' (and omit 'cup', 'slice'). And when they call out the order to the kitchen, you might also hear 'Two cheesecake for table three' (and sometimes 'Two cheesecakes for table three').

    Conclusion: the language of ordering might have its own peculiarities!
     

    roxcyn

    Senior Member
    USA
    American English [AmE]
    Hi Natkretep! I hope it's nice weather there.

    Of course, "I'll have a coffee and a cheesecake, please." works, too. I just imagine that the waitstaff get some rude customers (and cheap tippers!) so I try to be polite. If they give good service I leave a good tip.

    And of course what they write abbreviation. They might write: B/ 1 C. D/ 1 CC (=Beverage/ 1 Coffee. Dessert/ 1 Cheesecake).
     
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